Council steps in to save last of its kind building in Great Yarmouth from collapsing on itself

Plans have been drawn up for Great Yarmouth Borough Council to compulsory purchase the last remainin

Plans have been drawn up for Great Yarmouth Borough Council to compulsory purchase the last remaining wooden-framed building in the town centre. Photo: George Ryan - Credit: Archant

The last timber-framed building of its kind in Great Yarmouth is at risk of collapsing, councillors have heard.

Plans have been drawn up for Great Yarmouth Borough Council to compulsory purchase the last remainin

Plans have been drawn up for Great Yarmouth Borough Council to compulsory purchase the last remaining wooden-framed building in the town centre. Photo: George Ryan - Credit: Archant

The building at 160 King Street has fallen into disrepair and has been neglected since 2001, according to a report seen by the borough council.

Now, councillors have voted for a compulsory purchase of the site in a bid to save the historic structure.

A committee meeting heard the Grade-II listed building has reached a tipping point as rapid deterioration has begun because water is getting inside.

The report seen by the borough council's policy and resources committee stated the 500-year-old building has an early 19th century shop front.


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The report continued: 'It is an exceptionally important heritage asset not least because it is the last remaining timber-framed building in the urban area of Great Yarmouth.

'This offers a direct link with the town's mediaeval origins and is a rare survival.

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'It makes a significant contribution to the character and appearance of the King Street conservation in terms of the visual rhythm and spatial quality of the built environment of the street.

'It contributes to the fascinating standing archaeology of the area and the sense of evolution and development of the street from 16th century buildings to mid-20th century examples.'

The property was left in trust, and is being managed through executors of a will.

Despite attempts by the council to engage with them to bring about required improvements, no improvements have been made.

Subsequent enforcement action was taken by serving conservation-based improvement notices, but they were not complied with.

Council officers have now drawn up plans to compulsory purchase the property and work in partnership with Great Yarmouth Preservation Trust to restore it.

The cost to the council would be £57,000, which includes the valuation of the building and legal costs.

Based on the costs of other similar repair projects in King Street the full cost will be £350,000.

The report says the building is in such a state of disrepair it would be unlikely to sell on the open market, hence the plans for a compulsory purchase.

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