Council in talks with interested parties as Lowestoft’s Burger King drive-through remains on hold

Building work is on hold at the new drive-through Burger King in Lowestoft. Picture: Nick Butcher.

Building work is on hold at the new drive-through Burger King in Lowestoft. Picture: Nick Butcher. - Credit: Nick Butcher

Talks are continuing over the future of the Lowestoft Burger King site.

Building work is on hold at the new drive-through Burger King in Lowestoft. Picture: Nick Butcher.

Building work is on hold at the new drive-through Burger King in Lowestoft. Picture: Nick Butcher. - Credit: Nick Butcher

Work has been on hold since May after the company behind the new drive-through went into administration.

The fast food restaurant, which was unanimously approved by Waveney District Council, was due to be built on the site of the historic biscuit factory off Jubilee Way, with work starting at the end of 2016.

However the district council confirmed earlier this year that the franchise due to be managing the site had gone into administration, and although work on the site had reached an advanced stage, nothing more could be done until a new operator has been secured.

Since then, the site has remained fenced off and empty.

Building work is on hold at the new drive-through Burger King in Lowestoft. Picture: Nick Butcher.

Building work is on hold at the new drive-through Burger King in Lowestoft. Picture: Nick Butcher. - Credit: Nick Butcher


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But speaking this week, Waveney District Council said discussions are ongoing with a number of interested parties.

A spokesman said: 'Currently we are talking to a number of interested parties who have expressed an interest in working with the council to complete the development. Since the original Burger King franchisee went in to administration, we have not had to expend any money on the development as the site still rests with the administrator. Once a deal can be agreed with a new operator, we hope to get the development trading as quickly as possible.'

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The restaurant was approved on the grounds it would kickstart the regeneration of an area which would bring customers and further businesses to the north end of town. However it caused concern for heritage campaigners, as the Coopers Building dated back to the 1800s and was where long-life sea biscuits were manufactured until the 1960s.

The Lowestoft Civic Society and the Suffolk Preservation Society (SPS) were two groups who originally objected to the proposal, with representatives speaking out when news of the hold up first came to light saying they were 'dismayed' by the stalled development.

The groups said: 'This sad situation is deeply disappointing. Lowestoft has lost another part of its maritime heritage and has gained another vacant site with an uncertain future.'

• What would you like to see built on that site? Email lowestoft.journal@archant.co.uk

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