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Memorial in Norwich Cathedral to remember each Norfolk person to die from coronavirus

PUBLISHED: 15:42 17 June 2020 | UPDATED: 16:52 17 June 2020

The Right Reverend Graham Usher, Bishop of Norwich, kneels beside the crosses commemorating the lives lost to Coronavirus in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill Smith

The Right Reverend Graham Usher, Bishop of Norwich, kneels beside the crosses commemorating the lives lost to Coronavirus in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill Smith

Norwich Cathedral © 2020

A special memorial to those who have died from Coronavirus in Norfolk has been put in place at Norwich Cathedral.

The Right Reverend Graham Usher, Bishop of Norwich, with the crosses commemorating the lives lost to Coronavirus in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill SmithThe Right Reverend Graham Usher, Bishop of Norwich, with the crosses commemorating the lives lost to Coronavirus in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill Smith

More than 460 crosses, which each represent somebody who has died from Covid-19 in the county, have been carefully laid out in front of the Nave Altar.

The poignant flame of a single candle flickers in the centre of the memorial which on Monday was blessed by the Bishop of Norwich, The Rt Rev Graham Usher, and visited by Lady Dannatt, the Lord-Lieutenant of Norfolk, and her husband General The Lord Dannatt.

Canon Andy Bryant with the crosses remembering every life lost to Covid-19 in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill SmithCanon Andy Bryant with the crosses remembering every life lost to Covid-19 in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill Smith

The public were able to view the memorial for the first time on Monday when the Cathedral reopened its doors for individual prayer.

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Opening for individual prayer is the first phase in the reopening of the cathedral which, along with all Church of England churches and cathedrals, had been closed since March 23 as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. The cathedral is now open daily from 10am until 4pm.

The Rev Canon Andy Bryant, canon for mission and pastoral care at the cathedral, said: “As we begin to move towards the lifting of lockdown it feels important to not forget all those who have died from Covid-19. At Norwich Cathedral we especially wanted to remember all who have died across the county of Norfolk. We chose the symbol of a cross to mark each life lost as it is the supreme symbol of the depth of God’s love for each one of us. The sight of so many crosses laid out together is a poignant reminder of how many families are grieving as a result of this pandemic.”

Canon Andy Bryant with the crosses remembering every life lost to Covid-19 in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill SmithCanon Andy Bryant with the crosses remembering every life lost to Covid-19 in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill Smith

Norwich Cathedral has put in place a series of measures to help keep people as safe as possible when they visit.

This includes the limiting of the number of people allowed in the historic building at any one time, a special one-way system throughout the Cathedral, hand-cleaning facilities available throughout the route, and signage encouraging people to maintain social distance.

Canon Andy Bryant with the crosses remembering every life lost to Covid-19 in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill SmithCanon Andy Bryant with the crosses remembering every life lost to Covid-19 in the County of Norfolk. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill Smith

People are welcome to walk around the nave and light a candle on the Peace Globe, but the cathedral’s chapels, choir stalls and presbytery remain cordoned off to the public.

For more information www.cathedral.org.uk.


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