Community order for Michael Carroll

Lottery winner Michael Carroll was today ordered by Cambridge magistrates to take part in an “aggression replacement” programme after they heard how he threatened and abused train passengers when asked to turn music down.

Lottery winner Michael Carroll was today ordered by Cambridge magistrates to take part in an “aggression replacement” programme after they heard how he threatened and abused train passengers when asked to turn music down.

Carroll, 23, of Downham Market, had admitted affray and was ordered to complete a two-year community order.

Prosecutors told how Carroll lost his temper on a train travelling from London King's Cross to Cambridge on November 17.

They said he had been listening to music on a mobile phone while tapping a luggage rail with his ring-clad fingers.

He had then - using foul and abusive language - threatened commuter David Emeny-Smith, after being told that the noise was annoying.

Magistrates were told that Carroll threatened other passengers when they tried to intervene, saying: "Who are you to tell me what to do?'

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Neil Meachem, for Carroll, told the court his client's behaviour had been "wholly inappropriate".

"I suspect he was oblivious to the fact that his behaviour was annoying other people," said Mr Meachem.

"The words used, he perceived as a threat."

He said Carroll, who had an "alcohol problem", had been trying hard to stay out of trouble.

Paul Heavens, chairman of the bench, said he hoped Carroll was maturing and that his offending was at an end.

"We think a community order and the recommendations within that are most suitable...

"It may change your life. It may put an end to your court appearances. We certainly hope that is the case.

"The court does not necessarily appreciate the publicity you sometimes bring."

The order will run for two years and Carroll will be supervised by probation officers.

Outside court, Carroll - who has twice been jailed since winning £9.7million on the National Lottery four years ago - said he was relieved not to be returning to prison and added that his latest crime was a "hiccup".

The former dustman added that he sometimes wished he had never won the jackpot.

"It was an awful lot of money to give a young lad like me. I never thought my ticket would win,” he said.

"I don't really regret what I have done but I have lived a whole lifetime in a few years."