Revealed: the route for England coast path’s most easterly stretch

The Aldeburgh coastline, which will be part of the route. Photot: Mike Page

The Aldeburgh coastline, which will be part of the route. Photot: Mike Page - Credit: Mike Page

A moody stretch of coast famous for its sunken village is set to be included on a round-England coastal path.

Under new proposals unveiled by Natural England, the 37-mile (60-kilometre) route, stretching from Aldeburgh in Suffolk to Hopton in Norfolk, will be linked, giving better access to walkers and nature lovers.

The stretch of coast takes in the RSPB's Minsmere reserve.

From the beach, the route heads up onto the cliffs of Dunwich Heath past the National Trust tearooms at Coastguard Cottages.

The stretch turns into Greyfriars Wood, clips the remains of a 13th-century Franciscan priory, before heading to Dunwich, once an international port to rival London.


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People have eight weeks to have their say and, if approved, the stretch will become part of the 2,700-mile England Coast Path.

Hannah Thacker, of Natural England, said: "This stretch offers walkers the opportunity to explore 155 miles of unspoilt landscape including wildlife-rich estuaries, ancient heaths and windswept shingle beaches.

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"We would encourage anyone with an interest in the coast path to take the opportunity to respond to our proposals, and we look forward to hearing people's views."

A new off-road section of the trail is proposed over the River Dunwich for walkers' safety and enjoyment, before the route approaches Dingle Marshes.

The trail takes in the Blyth estuary, giving walkers the choice of using the local row boat ferry or crossing at the Bailey Bridge.

It then heads across the beach towards Southwold's promenades and famous pier.

Andrew Reid, Suffolk County Council's member for highways, transport and rural affairs, said: "This is a very exciting time for all those who love the Suffolk coastline and enjoy the peace and solitude it provides."

Anyone can have their say by March 25 and owners and occupiers of affected land may make objections about the reports on specified grounds, which will be considered by a planning inspector before the secretary of state makes a final decision.

Copies of the reports can be viewed in local libraries and council offices.

The full reports, and all the forms and guidance on how to make a representation or objection within the next eight weeks, are also available via this link.

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