Climate change safe havens revealed

A Norfolk scientist has revealed that Holt and Faken-ham are among the best places to live in the county if you want to avoid climate change.David Viner, who currently works at UEA but is about to leave for a new job advising Natural England on tackling global warming, travelled to the tip of Cornwall to present a programme for the BBC which airs tomorrow night.

A Norfolk scientist has revealed that Holt and Faken-ham are among the best places to live in the county if you want to avoid climate change.

David Viner, who currently works at UEA but is about to leave for a new job advising Natural England on tackling global warming, travelled to the tip of Cornwall to present a programme for the BBC which airs tomorrow night.

In the programme, Dr Viner reports that Birmingham could be the worst place to live in Britain to avoid climate change, while those most likely to benefit include parts of Somerset, Totnes and Dartmouth in Devon, and Holt and Fakenham in Norfolk.

He said Birmingham, like all big cities, fared badly because of air pollution compounded by traffic congestion.

“Hot summer temperatures, coupled with air pollution and the tendency for extreme storms will make Birmingham an unpleasant place to live,” he said.

According to Dr Viner, water will have the greatest impact on England in the future.

Most Read

Rising sea levels are already causing problems at places like Mullion Cove in Cornwall. The National Trust, which has spent £1m on repairs at the harbour, has already announced it will give it up if major damage is repeated in the future.

Extreme storms are likely to increase the vulnerability of Happisburgh cliffs in Norfolk, where 26 homes have already fallen into the sea. Cliff erosion has left others toppling on the edge.

Dr Viner says drier summers will bring water shortages in southern England, particularly if warmer temperatures attract more tourists.

However, wetter winters will increase the flood risk for people living along the River Severn in particular.

The documentary, Climate Change Now, is on at 7.30pm.