New rules for coastal care home in special measures

Clarence House residential home in Mundesley, owned by Ipswich-based Cephas Care. Picture: Google St

Clarence House residential home in Mundesley, owned by Ipswich-based Cephas Care. - Credit: Google StreetView

The health watchdog has imposed a number of conditions on a north Norfolk care home which is in special measures.

Clarence House Care Home in Sea View Road, Mundesley, now has to report to the Care Quality Commission (CQC) every month on a range of issues including its risk management, infection management and control and staffing.

Rachael Robertson, director for adult and community services at Cephas Care. 

Rachael Robertson, director for adult and community services at Cephas Care. - Credit: Stuart Anderson

The care home has also been told it can house a maximum of 41 people. 

 

In a report originally released in April and republished on June 8, the CQC criticised the "care environment" at the care home, and said people were not being protected from risk. Inspectors also had concerns over infection control and practices. 

Rachael Robertson, director for adult and community services at Ipswich-based Cephas Care, which operates the home, said they were committed to working with the CQC to improve its rating.


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She said: "We are still in operation and have no plans to stop operating at the service.

"We are full committed to the continued improvements which we are implementing with the service inline with our action plan which we are working on in conjunction with CQC and the quality assurance team at Norfolk County Council."

One of the rooms at Clarence House in Mundesley. 

One of the rooms at Clarence House in Mundesley. - Credit: Supplied by Cephas Care

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Under the conditions, Clarence House is unable to providing nursing care, but Mrs Robertson said they had not offered nursing care in the first place, because "we are a residential home not a nursing home."  

Following the initial publication of the report, Mrs Robertson said they felt "frustrated" it did not reflect the  "positive progress or hard work" which had taken place at Clarence House.


There were 21 people - some of whom have dementia - living at Clarence House when inspectors last visited.

In their report, inspectors said: "People were raising concerns with staff and members of the management team for example in relation to their medicines, and these were not being acted on. 

"Three people gave examples of where staff had been unkind to them, for example refusing to give a person pain relief and telling them to go back to sleep."



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