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Village streets to be lit up for Christmas in honour of children’s brain tumour charity

PUBLISHED: 09:00 22 October 2020 | UPDATED: 10:22 22 October 2020

Nell and Tristan Cork at Park Green in Hethersett where the whole road have decorated their homes to raise money in memory of Finbar Cork.
Picture:  Neil Perry / Archant

Nell and Tristan Cork at Park Green in Hethersett where the whole road have decorated their homes to raise money in memory of Finbar Cork. Picture: Neil Perry / Archant

Archant

Two roads in Hethersett will be lit up for charity again this Christmas in honour of a children’s brain tumour charity which has helped families through lockdown.

Tristan Cork with his son, Finnbar Cork, who died in 2016 at the age of five after being diagnosed with a brain tumour. Photo: Tristan CorkTristan Cork with his son, Finnbar Cork, who died in 2016 at the age of five after being diagnosed with a brain tumour. Photo: Tristan Cork

Last year, residents of Great Melton Close and Park Green raised hundreds of pounds for the locally-based Finnbar’s Force charity, which raises money for research into childhood brain tumours and supports families.

The charity was set-up in 2017 by Tristan and Claire Cork in memory of their son Finnbar, who died aged five from a brain tumour.

Mr Cork said: “I am super pleased that we will be able to extend the lights to make them even more spectacular this year.”

He said it had been a tough year for the charity which, like so many others, has suffered from pandemic restrictions which have hit events and fundraisers.

From left: Finnbar Cork, Claire Cork, Tristan Cork, Nell Cork. Picture: EACHFrom left: Finnbar Cork, Claire Cork, Tristan Cork, Nell Cork. Picture: EACH

He added that a number of projects and ideas have been put back by 12 to 18 months.

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Nevertheless the charity has been far from idle.

“We have been able to provide financial assistance to families, some of whom would have been left desperately short of money without support,” he said. “It is really sad to imagine how anyone could be left in this shocking position on top of having a seriously ill child.”

The charity has been able to give out £30,000 in grants over a four-month period during lockdown and Mr Cork admitted some of the feedback received had been “heart-wrenching”.

“We have been able to support more than 20 families in the Norfolk and Waveney areas thanks to our volunteers taking out such tasks as collecting shopping, ironing and cutting grass,” he added.

And he said he remained upbeat about the future and the “great people” who have continued to fundraise, with marathon bikeathons and even a jelly bucket challenge - which he described as “gross”.

Last year hundreds of people visited the lights, which are put up by local residents. Mr Cork is hoping that people will continue to be generous and make donations in spite of coronavirus restrictions.

Hethersett Parish Council is also allowing the charity to put lights on an oak tree it owns.


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