Christian Nash who died in a crash at Hevingham was not wearing a seat belt, inquest hears

The scene of the accident on the A140, north of Hevingham. Picture Luke Powell.

The scene of the accident on the A140, north of Hevingham. Picture Luke Powell. - Credit: Archant

A man who died after his car crashed into a tree on the A140 had been speeding and was not wearing a seat belt, an inquest has heard.

Christian Nash, 43, was pronounced dead at the scene following the crash on Cromer Road at Hevingham at about 1.30am on November 14 last year.

An inquest, held at Norwich Coroner's Court, heard Mr Nash, of St Mary's Road, Cromer, died as a result of 'multiple trauma due to a road traffic collision'.

A statement provided by a worker at Norwich Airport who had been riding a motorbike home on the morning of the crash said he was overtaken by a dark coloured car which was 'travelling very fast'.

By the time he reached Hevingham - where the speed limit is 50mph - there was something 'totally across the road' which was the black VW Passat that had passed him minutes earlier.


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The inquest heard the car had lost control, hit a tree and overturned.

Emergency services, including paramedics carried out CPR, but Mr Nash was pronounced dead at the scene.

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A toxicology report found he was above the legal limit for driving with 129 micrograms per 100 millilitres of blood. The legal limit is 80.

A forensic collision investigation report which found Mr Nash had not been wearing a seat belt and was above the legal alcohol limit, stated there was evidence he had been driving above the speed limit.

Senior Norfolk Coroner Jacqueline Lake recorded a conclusion that Mr Nash died as a result of a road traffic collision.

She said there were 'a number of factors which caused his death', including driving too fast, not wearing a seat belt and driving while above the legal alcohol limit.

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