When Charlie Watts rocked the east coast with the Stones

File photo dated 02/04/08 of Charlie Watts of The Rolling Stones arriving for the UK Film Premiere o

Charlie Watts of The Rolling Stones has died at the age of 80 - Credit: PA

Tributes have been pouring in from fans and fellow musicians for Charlie Watts, the lifelong drummer for the Rolling Stones, who died on Tuesday, August 24.

The rhythmic stalwart died peacefully in a London hospital surrounded by his family.

Back in the 1960s, The Rolling Stones burst onto the pop scene with their early focus on Rhythm and Blues hits and made quite a splash at the seaside.

On September 6, 1963, The Rolling Stones performed at The Grand Hotel ballroom in Lowestoft.

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964 - Credit: EDP Library

The band had only been together for several months and were beginning to make a name for themselves on the UK circuit and this concert was the first time the band had performed on the east coast.


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Slide guitarist Brian Jones was absent from the gig, but the makeshift foursome - Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts - surpassed expectations of the band themselves.

In a 1999 interview with the Easter Daily Press, bassist Bill Wyman said: 'That was a great gig.

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"It was the first time that we were actually mobbed on stage.

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964 - Credit: EDP Library

"The kids started coming on stage – there was no security in those days – and they attacked us.

"We got our clothes ripped off.

"I lost jewellery – a ring, stuff like that."

They were paid a meagre £20 with accommodation provided.

The Stones returned two more times to Lowestoft in 1964, playing at the Pavilion on January 23, and the Royal Hotel ballroom on April 6.

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964 - Credit: EDP Library

Following the success of the Lowestoft shows, as well as one in Norwich, the bad-boy band made their way back to the east coast.

The Stones played two shows at the town's ABC on Sunday, July 25, 1965 - one in the early evening and then another immediately after.

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964 - Credit: EDP Library

For both shows, front row tickets cost 15 shillings (75p).

The Stones toured the region following three consecutive number one hits with It’s All Over NowLittle Red Rooster and The Last Time.

At the time of the concert, (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction was number one in the US, but the song was unavailable in the UK at the time due to the lyrical content.

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964 - Credit: EDP Library

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964

The Rolling Stones at the Gaumont Theatre, Norwich in April 1964 - Credit: EDP Library

Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones at Norwich Gaumont. pic taken april 25th 1964 c12545

Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones at Norwich Gaumont. April 25th 1964. - Credit: Archant

Charlie Watts of The Rolling Stones in action at Norwich Gaumont on April 25 1964.

Charlie Watts of The Rolling Stones in action at Norwich Gaumont on April 25 1964. - Credit: Archant Library

File photo dated 14/12/69 of The Rolling Stones rehearsing at the Saville Theatre, London, left to r

The Rolling Stones rehearsing at the Saville Theatre, London, left to right, Mick Taylor, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts (behind) in 1969 - Credit: PA

The Rolling Stones during their performance at Stevenage's Locarno Ballroom on April 1, 1964. Pictur

The Rolling Stones during their performance at Stevenage's Locarno Ballroom on April 1, 1964. - Credit: Courtesy of Richard Houghton


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