No more Dizzy Blonde or Slack Alice: Norfolk brewers welcome sexist beer names ban

Members of Norfolk's brewery community have welcomed a ban on beers with sexist names appearing at T

Members of Norfolk's brewery community have welcomed a ban on beers with sexist names appearing at The Great British Beer Festival. Photo: Simon Finlay - Credit: Archant

Brewers in Norfolk have welcomed a ban on beers with sexist names appearing at the Great British Beer festival, but say the new rule shouldn't be needed.

Brewers in Norfolk have welcomed a ban on beers with sexist names appearing at the Great British Bee

Brewers in Norfolk have welcomed a ban on beers with sexist names appearing at the Great British Beer festival, but say the new rule shouldnt be needed. Photo: Simon Finlay - Credit: Archant

The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) which organises the annual celebration of beer has banned all drinks with sexist names or packaging from appearing at its London event.

The blanket ban on brews like Dizzy Blonde and Slack Alice follows a survey which found 68pc of female drinkers would be unlikely to buy a beer if it was advertised using sexist imagery.

It also comes after the Society of Independent Brewers (SIBA) introduced stricter guidelines on sexist beer labelling last year.

In Norfolk, a county which boasts plenty of female brewers, news of the ban has been greeted positively but many said such bans should not have to be enforced.

Rachel Holliday with her husband David co-founders of The Norfolk Brewhouse. Picture: Rae Shirley P

Rachel Holliday with her husband David co-founders of The Norfolk Brewhouse. Picture: Rae Shirley Photography - Credit: Archant


You may also want to watch:


Dawn Leeder, co-chair of Norwich City of Ale, said: "I think it's a welcome move on the part of CAMRA. 'The times they are a-changin'' but slowly like a lot of these things.

"I think CAMRA has woken up to that fact that this is an issue, especially for female drinkers and young people who are more sensitive to these issues. It's a move that has been a long time coming."

Most Read

Ms Leeder said she could not think of a brewery in Norfolk using sexist imagery or names to help sell its beer and that with more and more women working in the industry such ploys no longer reflected the industry.

"It's a case of desperate marketing; if the beer is good enough it sells.

"We have a lot of female events in the City of Ale, female brewers, visitors and obviously lots of publicans so we don't really think it's as an issue for us in Norwich."

Rachel Holliday, co-founder of Moon Gazer Ale at Norfolk Brewhouse, said: "I support CAMRA's rule, but still find it annoying that we continue to have these conversations in today's society. Times have changed. Do you really need to use any sexual imagery to sell a beer? I think not."

Ian Stamp, chairman of Norwich and Norfolk CAMRA branch said the move was not a new idea within the industry and not something which was a particular problem in Norfolk, he said: "It's been something that as an organisation we have been against for several years."

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter