Women in Engineering day aims to inspire a future generation of female engineers

Helen Cavill, engineer at M&H Plastics. Picture: Jon Kennard

Helen Cavill, engineer at M&H Plastics. Picture: Jon Kennard - Credit: Archant

Girls are being urged to consider a career in engineering in a bid to break the pattern which has led the UK to have the lowest proportion of female engineers in Europe.

Girls are being urged to consider a career in engineering in a bid to break the pattern which has led the UK to have the lowest proportion of female engineers in Europe.

With women making up just 9% of the UK engineering workforce, tomorrow's National Women in Engineering Day will celebrate the role of women in the industry.

In Norwich, MP Chloe Smith will speak at an event at the John Innes Centre, and the top 50 women in engineering will be published to mark the occasion.

Engineer Helen Cavill, who works at Beccles-based M&H Plastics, said: 'I am determined that girls should no longer miss out on the great experience of an engineering career because of not understanding what engineering can offer.'


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Tomorrow's event will see more than 200 schoolgirls from across the region discussing engineering with businesses including Claxton Engineering, AID Industrial, Proeon Systems, EDF Energy, Hethel Innovation, Extremis Technology, the Engineering Construction Industry Training Board and East of England Energy Group.

Oil and gas skills organisation OPITO's Liz Davis-Smith said: 'Although the downturn in oil price continues to impact the industry, it's important that we continue to open our young people up to the possibilities that the industry holds.

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'The energy sector needs good people with the right skills and we can only support this by giving the next generation, women in particular today, a deeper understanding of the diverse range of engineering roles the industry encompasses.'

And in order to encourage young girls to consider a career in engineering, Gennie Dearman, regional director of the Engineering Development Trust, said it was important to influence teachers and parents as well.

'Part of the reason the number of women engineers is low is the perception of what it means to be an engineer,' she said.

Are you launching a new engineering business? Email sabah.meddings@archant.co.uk

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