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Norfolk blogger fighting the stigma of Down’s Syndrome

PUBLISHED: 07:00 21 March 2018 | UPDATED: 11:48 21 March 2018

Rebecca Fisher is fighting the stigma of Down's Syndrome in her blog The Coastal Mummy. Pictured is her brother Rory Thompson. Picture: Rebecca Fisher

Rebecca Fisher is fighting the stigma of Down's Syndrome in her blog The Coastal Mummy. Pictured is her brother Rory Thompson. Picture: Rebecca Fisher

Rebecca Fisher

The sister of a boy with Down’s Syndrome is hoping to fight the stigma surrounding the condition through her award-winning blog.

Rebecca Fisher with Rory Thompson at the Don't Screen Us Out demonstration in Westminster, Picture: Rebecca FisherRebecca Fisher with Rory Thompson at the Don't Screen Us Out demonstration in Westminster, Picture: Rebecca Fisher

Mother-of-two Rebecca Fisher, 23, from Burnham Market, writes about the achievements of her three-year-old brother Rory Thompson in her blog The Coastal Mummy.

When her mother was pregnant with Rory, she was told there was a one in five chance he would be born with Down’s Syndrome.

“When he was born we didn’t know what to expect,” Mrs Fisher said. “We never have any experience of Down’s Syndrome before. 
“We had a new life to accustom to, you wonder what life was going to be like.”

But Mrs Fisher said Rory has grown up to be a healthy and happy three-year-old who has made many achievements.

King’s Lynn Town Hall will be lit up in yellow and blue to mark World Down Syndrome Day on March 21. Picture: Courtesy of West Norfolk councilKing’s Lynn Town Hall will be lit up in yellow and blue to mark World Down Syndrome Day on March 21. Picture: Courtesy of West Norfolk council

This has motivated her to let others know that people with Down’s Syndrome are still able to live a fulfilled life and having a sibling with the illness is not a burden.

“No one knows if it’s going to happen to them, and I’m trying to get it out there that it’s not the end of the world,” Mrs Fisher added.

“My mum’s chances were one in five but I have a friend whose child has Down’s Syndrome and her chances were one in 10,000.”

Mrs Fisher pointed to the high number of Down’s Syndrome abortions in the UK which she said currently stands at 90pc.

She said that although it was ultimately a woman’s choice what they do with their body, better education could help mothers make a choice that is not based on panic.

“The percentage of Down’s Syndrome abortions is very high,” she added. “Most of it is how it’s brought across by people in hospitals.

“When my mum was told Rory had Down’s Syndrome, the nurses were like ‘I’m so sorry’.

“There needs to be more education and information about support groups.”

In October 2016, Mrs Fisher, along with Rory, staged a protest with Don’t Screen Us Out campaigners outside the Houses of Parliament.

Supporters of the campaign handed a petition to Parliament which protested against proposals to introduce a new screening technique, which they felt would lead to an increase in the number of children with Down’s Syndrome screened out by termination.

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