Brothers' bitter high court feud

A bitter family feud between two Norfolk brothers over a piece of land in the county has been taken to the High Court in London.Edward Woodcock, 73, and William Woodcock, 81, have been arguing over a piece of land bought in the 1960s at Gateley Common, near Dereham.

A bitter family feud between two Norfolk brothers over a piece of land in the county has been taken to the High Court in London.

Edward Woodcock, 73, and William Woodcock, 81, have been arguing over a piece of land bought in the 1960s at Gateley Common, near Dereham.

Edward says his elder brother is trying to evict him from a caravan on the land, in which he has been living since 1974.

He claims the brothers agreed to buy the land together - but in William's name - and that he contributed £200 towards the deposit and more in the form of mortgage repayments.

But William, a father-of-three, claims Edward did not contribute towards the £1,200 cost of the land and has no right to stay.

He is asking Deputy Judge Sonia Proudman QC to declare that he and his wife, Nora, are the sole owners of the land and entitled to take possession action against the Edward.

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William first asked his brother, to whom he stopped speaking in 1998, through his solicitors, to vacate the land in May 2001, but Edward refused and court proceedings followed.

Appearing in the witness box yesterday, Edward described

how his elder brother, who he

said he had "worshipped", asked him to help fund the purchase

of the property in 1961, when

the two brothers ran a garage together.

Their intention was to jointly buy the property, which would be in William's name only, and then, at a later date, when the first tran-saction was complete, club toge-ther to buy somewhere for Edward, he told the court.

He said he had sold a car, a 1939 Buick, and other belongings in order to scrape together enough money for the deposit, while his work buying and selling cars was enough to fund the £2 10s mortgage repayments.

But, when asked by Miss Bedworth what he had sold, he said he could not remember.

The case, which is expected to last at least three days, continues.

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