These are the dog breeds given up most at a Norfolk rehoming centre

These are the breeds most given up at Dogs Trust rehoming centre in Snetterton, Norfolk.

These are the breeds most given up at Dogs Trust rehoming centre in Snetterton, Norfolk. - Credit: Dogs Trust/Canva

An active Staffordshire cross and a pair of “bouncy” Jack Russells are just three of many pups looking for new homes in Norfolk.

Unfortunately for them, their breeds are one of the most seen by staff at the Snetterton branch of Dogs Trust.

The charity says trends dictate the breeds that are brought to rehoming centres and many of these are now at "full capacity". 

In Norfolk in 2021, the breed which was given up to the charity the most frequently were Labrador type dogs - which made up 10pc of all animals brought to the centre. 

This was followed by Pugs which made up 8pc, Terrier types  at 7pc, and then Staffordshire types, Spaniels and Springers which made up 5pc of all relinquished dog breeds. 

But Adam Levy, Dogs Trust head of operations in the South East of England, said these higher percentages are mostly due to the popularity of the breeds.  

“The reason that Labradors may be at the top is because they are being rehomed pretty quickly so we have the capacity to take in more of that particular breed,” he said. “Compared to other breeds which aren’t rehomed as quickly. 

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“Pugs are also known for being fairly easy breeds, so if we had one, we wouldn’t be expecting it to hang around for very long. 

“Another thing to be aware of is, whatever breed seems to be in fashion one year you start seeing in rescues in higher numbers the years following. 

“It has a knock-on effect.” 

But since the coronavirus pandemic, which saw many people buy and rehome dogs during lockdown, Mr Levy said numbers of relinquished dogs have risen even more as life has returned to normal. 

He added: “Dog ownership can be impacted by the challenges of life and sometimes owners simply aren't able to care for them anymore. 

“During the pandemic, the demand was certainly outweighed relinquishments. For the first time I have been at Dogs Trust, we saw reduced capacity at our kennels and even some empty kennels. 

“But that has now changed and we have gone back to have full capacity at our centres once more. 

“Although having a dog is fantastic you need to be aware of everything that is involved. Do your research and think about the commitment before making that decision.” 

Could you rehome Bailey and Poppy or Buster? 

Bailey and Poppy, Jack Russells, eight and over, females

Bailey the Jack Russell is up for adoption at Dogs Trust in Snetterton.

Bailey the Jack Russell is up for adoption at Dogs Trust in Snetterton. - Credit: Dogs Trust

“Bailey would like a home with her best friend Poppy. The pair have a close bond and would like to find a forever home together. 

“Bailey is a happy little girl with lots of energy. She would like a home that will keep her and mentally and physically stimulated. 

“Poppy is a little live wire who can be bouncy and full of beans, she has not had much training but would love to learn new things. 

Poppy the Jack Russell is up for adoption at Dogs Trust in Snetterton.

Poppy the Jack Russell is up for adoption at Dogs Trust in Snetterton. - Credit: Dogs Trust

“They will need adopters to be around most of the time in the beginning. 

“Poppy and Bailey would like a calm and patient home to settle into with access to interesting walks away from busy places.” 

Buster, Staffordshire Cross, eight and over, male 

Buster the Staffordshire cross is up for adoption at Dogs Trust in Snetterton. 

Buster the Staffordshire cross is up for adoption at Dogs Trust in Snetterton. - Credit: Dogs Trust

“Buster is still an active chap at 10-years-old and loving his walks and playing games.  

“Although he can be a little unsure around new people at first, given time, he comes out of his shell and is lovely boy who enjoys human company.   

“Buster is hoping to find patient, understanding adopters who will help him to settle in and adjust to home life. 

"He will need them to be with him for most of the time initially, but once he is settled and happy, he can gradually be left for short periods.   

“He is looking for a quiet home where he is the only pet, so he can be the centre of attention.”