Filming of BBC Springwatch set for Norfolk return

BBC Springwatch presenters Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan at the Wild Ken Hill estate in west Norfolk

BBC Springwatch presenters Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan at the Wild Ken Hill estate in west Norfolk - Credit: Danielle Booden

Norfolk will host a popular BBC Two nature programme again at the end of the month.

Springwatch will come back to Wild Ken Hill, on the coast near Snettisham, for three weeks of live programmes on May 30 as part of its 2022 series.

Presenters Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan will be at the west Norfolk site, where forward thinking land management methods both care for and, crucially, co-exist with wildlife.

More than 30 remote cameras will capture some of the season's best wildlife and allow a closer insight into their activity.

Polecat (Picture: PA)

More than 30 remote cameras allow a closer insight into some of the season's best wildlife - Credit: PA

Some of the nests that Springwatch will follow include those of kestrels, marsh harriers, goshawk and red kites, as well as the farmland birds in linnets, grey partridge and curlew.

The cameras are also set up to capture activity in the beaver enclosure as spring provides a great opportunity to catch a glimpse of the season's new kits.

Springwatch also plans to put a live camera on a bee colony to provide an insight into their society and watch closely as the queen bee arrives before the colony grows.

The audience will be encouraged to feed into the content throughout the three weeks and presenters will react to topics and questions as they come in.

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In an Instagram post, a spokesman for Wild Ken Hill said: "We are incredibly excited to welcome Michaela, Chris and the whole BBC Team back to Wild Ken Hill for a unique insight into the behaviour of some of our most incredible creatures as well as showcasing the restorative power of nature.

"As always, we are expecting more than a few surprises along the way!"

Last year, viewers heard how chiffchaff at the site are feeding their young on insects and how brown hares were active during the evening period, known for their boxing matches at this time of year particularly during the mating season.

Mr Packham revealed a "super abundance" of brown hares at Wild Ken Hill and has seen more of the animals while on the farm than he has in the last year.

Viewers were told how the 4,000-acre farm consisted of three areas used for traditional conservation, rewilding and regenerative agriculture.