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Ancient coin hoards discovered near Downham Market and Pulham St Mary ruled as treasure

PUBLISHED: 15:36 06 October 2015 | UPDATED: 15:36 06 October 2015

Part of the hoard of Sceattas

Part of the hoard of Sceattas

Archant

A hoard of Roman silver coins and a number of early medieval coins have been ruled to be treasure.

South Norfolk coin hoard. Pictured: An anonymous issuer 115-114BC . Picture: SuppliedSouth Norfolk coin hoard. Pictured: An anonymous issuer 115-114BC . Picture: Supplied

A total of 26 Roman denarii were unearthed by John Kineavy using a metal detector.

The discovery marks the third hoard from the same location in Pulham St Mary and it is thought more could still be found at the site.

Norfolk coroner Jacqueline Lake, sitting at King’s Lynn County Court, said the coins ranged from Republican issue to those of Roman Emperor Tiberius.

They were issued between 154BC and AD37.

South Norfolk coin hoard. Pictured :Lucius Caesius 112-111BC. Picture: SuppliedSouth Norfolk coin hoard. Pictured :Lucius Caesius 112-111BC. Picture: Supplied

The find was made on October 30 2014 and earlier collections, discovered in September 2012 and August 2013, included about 100 coins from the same period.

The court heard Norwich Castle Museum are interested in housing the collection.

At yesterday’s inquest Mrs Lakes also ruled another batch of coins found in Fincham near Downham Market as treasure.

The coins were found by Stephen Sproule using a metal detector on August 30 2014.

South Norfolk coin hoard. Pictured: Tiberius AD14-37. Picture: SuppliedSouth Norfolk coin hoard. Pictured: Tiberius AD14-37. Picture: Supplied

Mr Sproule also discovered a number of coins in October 2011 while metal detecting on land at Fincham.

At an inquest in April 2014, Mrs Lake said the coins were scattered over a wide area and appeared represent a hoard or part of a hoard.

Yesterday she said the most recent collection of treasure comprised eight silver Sceattas and described them as “porcupine types” - which refers to the design on the coin.

She said they dated back to 730AD to 750AD.

The coroner said the age and the metal content of the item qualified it to be classed as treasure.

Lynn Museum had expressed an interest in acquiring the coins, the court was told.

Have you found an interesting collection of treasure? Email sophie.biddle@archant.co.uk

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