Warm work in west Norfolk

It is obviously warm work laying asphalt on this late September day in 1960 as the team prepare the entrance to the new Dow Chemicals' factory at King's Lynn.

It is obviously warm work laying asphalt on this late September day in 1960 as the team prepare the entrance to the new Dow Chemicals' factory at King's Lynn.

The scaffolding can be seen on the side of the building in the far distance as the road roller trundles towards the lens of retired EDP chief photographer Tony Kemp. In a sign of the times, most of the gang including the driver of the steam roller (SN? 25?) are enjoying a cigarette. How times have changed.

The driver of Ayton Asphalte's machine, PVF 398, appears to have left his seat. One man is partially hidden behind the right-hand side while the others look towards the camera, was he the driver?

If any reader has any details or information, please write to Michael Pollitt, rural affairs editor, Prospect House, Rouen Road, Norwich, NR1 1RE.


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Copies of this staff photograph, C4795, can be obtained from EDP offices.

t A retired foreman with Ayton Asphalte, John Lock, of Ketts Avenue, Wymondham, who worked for the company for 42 years, was one of the team in this Memory Lane photograph.

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“As an employee of Ayton Asphalte from January 1948 until retirement in 1990, I was delighted to see the photograph in the EDP, “Asphalt layers light up at King's Lynn.”

The registration number of the roller is SNG 257 and the roll driver, Norman Stone, lived at Morley St Botolph, near Wymondham. It was not a steam roller but a Greens 8/10 ton roll powered by a Perkins diesel engine. Its extra two tons were made up by filling the front and rear wheels with water. The laying machine was bought new in March 1945 and I had the pleasure of driving it.

“The other men in the picture were (from left) Reg (Paddy) Goldsmith, John Caddy and Charlie Lux. It is my head peeping over the back although by the time the photograph was taken, I had been made up foreman.

“It was my job to maintain the level from a plate than ran across the back of the machine. Maybe, the driver, Billy Edmonds, has taken a brief break?

“Sadly, I'm the only one left to tell the tale of many happy years that we spent travelling around laying asphalt in Norfolk and the eastern region.”

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