In my view: Time to get rid of TV licences

File photo dated 23/3/2015 of BBC Broadcasting House in Portland Place, London. Photo credit: Antho

File photo dated 23/3/2015 of BBC Broadcasting House in Portland Place, London. Photo credit: Anthony Devlin/PA Wire - Credit: PA

In today's 21st-century modern age of multi-channel TV and media, the British public shouldn't have to keep buying a TV licence – it should just be abolished.

File photo dated 25/03/14 of a TV licence. Photo credit: Steve Parsons/PA Wire

File photo dated 25/03/14 of a TV licence. Photo credit: Steve Parsons/PA Wire - Credit: PA

Every UK household (except those of the over-75s) has to fork out £145.50 annually for a TV licence or face criminal proceedings, and in return receives a mere handful of BBC TV and radio channels.

It somehow seems wrong that in times of national austerity and cutbacks that extortionate amounts of our TV licence money is spent on costly programmes and highly paid BBC managers, presenters, actors and newsreaders appointed without the paying public having any say in the matter.

For instance, multi-millionaire Chris Evans was recently just 'given' the new Top Gear presenter job, and could rake in £4m – an outrageous sum as it's not like they're sending him down a coal-mine or to a war-zone.

His predecessor Jeremy Clarkson also made millions from the good ole Beeb – astonishing pay when you compare it to an NHS doctor's wage.


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Surely presenters' vacancies should be advertised like with most jobs; consequently the BBC would then get fresh-faced, good, new presenters for less.

Maybe in the 1970s heyday, when TV sets were a novelty and the whole family sat together glued every night watching BBC classics such as The Good Life or Dad's Army, it seemed we were getting our money's worth. Plus when it broadcast all manner of sports it made good value family viewing – unlike today when most sport, including Premier League/international football and boxing, is now shown on ITV/satellite stations and unbelievably even BBC coverage of the next Olympics is now in jeopardy, too!

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Furthermore back in the old days we had little choice – we either watched BBC or ITV – whereas nowadays people are tuning away from these traditional channels in favour of subscribing to satellite TV or viewing programmes on the internet instead.

Nowadays with numerous repeats shown on BBC, a good night's viewing is few and far between. Plus many of its classics have been sold off to other channels, which subsequently make profit from advertisements, the very thing the BBC argues it wants to avoid.

Moreover the recent scandals, court cases and convictions have tarnished the BBC's reputation forever, so why should this national institution still be allowed to keep calm and carry on regardless at the British licence-payers' expense?

•These are the views of Jane Reynolds rather than the EDP of Evening News

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