Video: SHARP dig at Sedgeford gets under way

The SHARP archaeological dig at Sedgeford, with modern-day village in the background. Picture: Ian B

The SHARP archaeological dig at Sedgeford, with modern-day village in the background. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: IAN BURT

From hoards of coins and golden torcs to mysterious skeletons, the Sedgeford archaeological project has produced numerous historic artefacts from the Saxon era since it began in 1996.

An archaeologist sifts through material. Picture: Ian Burt

An archaeologist sifts through material. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: IAN BURT

Now excavations are under way again, as archaeologists and volunteers hope to uncover more of the ancient settlement.

Two trenches are being worked on at the moment, between 750 and 1,000 tonnes of earth were removed from what is now called trench 19 where archaeologists are scraping back the soil to reveal a number of large clay ovens, which may have been used for drying grain to make bread and beer.

John Jolleys from SHARP - the Sedgeford Historical and Archaeological Research Project - said: 'This is a site of organised industry not where you would have your house or your cottage.'

The significant levels of production which would have happened here suggests that much of the produce from this area would likely have been traded with other parts of the East Anglian Kingdom rather than consumed locally.


You may also want to watch:


Other objects have been found in the first few days of this year's dig including pieces of a human skull. In the next field over is trench 18 where the foundations of Saxon house have been discovered. Saxon houses were not made from stone so little of the actual building remains but the foundation trenches are clearly visible. However this building would have had substantial walls at the time and measured about 20ft by 4ft.

Project direector Jon cousins said: 'Although this seems narrow by modern standards this would have been normal for Anglo-Saxons'

Most Read

Mr Cousins, who has been involved in SHARP for 13 years, said: 'It's incredible, coming from a completely different background, I was a factory worker in King's Lynn now after 13 years to have become a project director.'

For more information on SHARP, go online to www.sharp.org.uk. This year's dig continues until Friday, August 15. The project's annual open day will be held on Sunday, July 27 (10am - 4pm).

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus