From St George’s Guildhall to Booton Church - vote for your favourite historic Norfolk landmark

St. Georges Guildhall in Kings Lynn is the largest and oldest guildhall in England. Picture: Matth

St. Georges Guildhall in Kings Lynn is the largest and oldest guildhall in England. Picture: Matthew Usher.

Historic England are calling on the public, history groups and experts to help them create a list of the 100 buildings and places which best tell England's remarkable story and its impact on the world - and St. George's Guildhall in King's Lynn could just make the shortlist.

Booton Church was built by amateur architect Whitwell Elwin. Picture: Courtesy of Broadland District

Booton Church was built by amateur architect Whitwell Elwin. Picture: Courtesy of Broadland District Council. - Credit: Broadland District Council

The year-long campaign, Irreplaceable: A History of England in 100 Places, will be divided into 10 categories. Each category will focus on 10 places chosen from a long list of public nominations by expert judges.

The places that make the list will feature in a podcast series and a handbook.

But of all the wonderful historic buildings in Norfolk is St George's Guildhall in the greatest peril and most in need of support?

Let us know what historic Norfolk landmark you'd vote for in our poll.


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History of St. George's Guildhall

St. George's Guildhall in King's Lynn is the largest and oldest guildhall in England, but also the only surviving theatre where Shakespeare is known to have performed.

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For the most part of its existence, St George's Guildhall has been a theatre and a place for public entertainment with the first known theatrical production taking place there in 1442.

The Guild of St George was founded in Lynn in 1376 when the town was one of the most prosperous in England and since then it has had a wide variety of owners and uses uses.

Over the years the historic building has been left derelict on several occasions and has regularly faced demolition.

In 1951 it was given to the National Trust who, in turn, leased it to the Borough Council until 2050. The input of the Pilgrim Trust, Arts Council and a public subscription led to the Guildhall's conversion to an Arts Centre and theatre. The late Queen Mother opened the venue in 1951 and launched the King's Lynn Festival, which has been held every July since then.

In 1997 the Borough Council took responsibility for the programming and operation of the Arts Centre and in 2011 this was taken over by the King's Lynn Arts Centre Trust. Sadly, the Trust closed in December 2015 and the buildings once again remain under-used, neglected and in need of refurbishment.

You can nominate your favourite landmark in Historic England's official survery here.

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