Archaeologists discover more about the lives of King’s Lynn fisherfolk

Digging deep in the garden at True's Yard are (L) Margaret Macdougall and Rebecca Reed. Picture: Ian

Digging deep in the garden at True's Yard are (L) Margaret Macdougall and Rebecca Reed. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

A great deal is already known about the fisherfolk who once lived and worked in the North End of King's Lynn during Georgian and Victorian times – but archaeologists are discovering even more.

Piece of pottery found at True's Yard dig: Picture David Bale

Piece of pottery found at True's Yard dig: Picture David Bale - Credit: Archant

Members of West Norfolk and King's Lynn Archaeological Society took part in a dig at the True's Yard museum garden on Saturday.

A test pit was dug and each 10cm was recorded using the Cambridge University recording form.

Bill Howard, from the society, said: 'This area used to be fishermen's cottages so it's a working class area.

'We were looking for diagnostic artefacts – items you can date – such as broken bits of pottery.


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'Among the items we found was one piece of pottery that could date back to the 1200s. It would almost certainly have been thrown out at that time, and has remained buried ever since.'

Fellow society member Margaret Macdougall said the dig was held to promote their work and encourage more people, especially youngsters, to get involved.

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For more information visit wnklas.greyhawk.org.uk

Have you unearthed a rare artefact in your garden? Email david.bale2@archant.co.uk

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