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Star of Netflix's Making a Murderer coming to Norwich

PUBLISHED: 10:10 22 January 2020 | UPDATED: 10:16 22 January 2020

Netflix's series Making A Murderer follows the case of Steven Avery which captured the world's attention Credit: Netflix/IMDB

Netflix's series Making A Murderer follows the case of Steven Avery which captured the world's attention Credit: Netflix/IMDB

Netflix/IMDB

Fans of hit Netflix crime documentary Making a Murderer will gain a unique insight into a case that captured the world's attention at a Q&A in Norwich with one of its stars.

Steven Avery in Netflix's series Making A Murderer (2015 - ). Credit: Netflix/IMDBSteven Avery in Netflix's series Making A Murderer (2015 - ). Credit: Netflix/IMDB

The show, which was first broadcast in 2015 and has run for two seasons, was filmed over 13 years and tells the story of Steven Avery from Manitowoc County, Wiconsin, who served 18 years in prison after being wrongly convicted of sexual assault and the attempted murder of Penny Beerntsen.

After being arrested in 1985, he was then released in 2003 and filed a lawsuit against Manitowoc County, but in 2005 he was arrested for the murder of Teresa Halbach and later convicted in 2007.

In parallel, the show also explores the connected story of Brendan Dassey, Steven's nephew, who was convicted for his involvement in Halbach's killing.

In the second series, released in 2018, it explores the aftermath of both of their convictions and focuses on their families and the numerous appeals that have taken place.

Steven Avery's defence lawyer Jerry Buting in Making a Murderer is coming to Norwich Credit: Supplied by UEASteven Avery's defence lawyer Jerry Buting in Making a Murderer is coming to Norwich Credit: Supplied by UEA

READ MORE: A talk exploring the psychology of serial killers is coming to Norwich

Avery's lawyer Jerry Buting is heading to The LCR in Norwich on Friday, January 31 for a live Q&A event and he will speak about the case along with its broader implications.

He will also comment on the systematic failures of the criminal justice system and there will be the opportunity to see clips from the case that were never aired and ask questions to one of the most prominent figures in the modern American legal system.

With over 35 years of experience in criminal defence law, Jerry Buting has not only gained worldwide recognition for his role in the Steven Avery case but has been an outspoken voice for criminal justice reform including problems of mass incarceration, a flawed jury system, unreliable forensic science and police and prosecutor bias or misconduct.

The Q&A starts at 7pm, with doors opening at 6.30pm and tickets cost £15 full price and £7 for students - you can purchase them at ueaticketbookings.co.uk

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