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Laugh in the Park review: Phill Jupitus shows another side away from QI and Buzzcocks fame

PUBLISHED: 00:03 29 July 2019 | UPDATED: 00:03 29 July 2019

Headline act at Laugh in the Park 2019, Phill Jupitus. Photo: Contributed

Headline act at Laugh in the Park 2019, Phill Jupitus. Photo: Contributed

Archant

"He's not like he is on QI," quipped Laugh in the Park's Sunday headliner Phil Jupitus - talking about himself - as he took to the stage in the big top for the final night of the comedy festival.

Support act at Laugh in the Park 2019, Phil Nichol. Photo: Wolf MarlohSupport act at Laugh in the Park 2019, Phil Nichol. Photo: Wolf Marloh

And he wasn't kidding - Jupitus' set, although raucously funny, contained too many swearwords to include many full quotes here but it was a half an hour which had the audience in stitches.

Like nearly every comedian over the last few days Brexit and Boris Johnson were hot topics - Jupitus' description of Mr Johnson is unprintable in a family newspaper but he's not his biggest fan.

And the Never Mind the Buzzcocks star said he had started telling people abroad Brexit was "like Mad Max Fury Road's bit with the cast of Downton Abbey".

Away from politics Jupitus touched on fatherhood to his two grown up daughters, and life in his small village near Fife where the dream of living by the sea was ruined when he found out how seals really sound - a noise all too well known by those on Norfolk's coast.

Support act at Laugh in the Park 2019, Laura Lexx. Photo: WCB ComedySupport act at Laugh in the Park 2019, Laura Lexx. Photo: WCB Comedy

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Keeping the local theme Jupitus' parting words were to urge everyone to visit the John Sell Cotman exhibition at the Castle Museum in Norwich.

Jupitus' joy at performing was evident as he laughed along to his own patter, even confiding in the audience at one point that he was laughing because he hadn't heard any of it before either.

Prior to the main event classic jibes at Ipswich had got a cheer from the Norwich crowd, and compere John Mann read a fictional story from a copy of the Lowestoft Journal about a man from Great Yarmouth whose charity shop jigsaw of a cottage turned out to be of two naked women.

To give him credit the only reason I knew it wasn't real was because this newspaper's style guide doesn't put people's ages in brackets as he described.

Support acts Phil Nichol and Laura Lexx were both entertaining but Nichol's in-your-face hyperactivity which excited the crowd was tempered by Lexx's passivity, although a few strong jokes kept comedy-goers on her side until the end.

A strong end to another successful summer run for the Red Card Comedy Club.

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