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Are Snapchat and Instagram good or bad for your health?

PUBLISHED: 14:09 08 October 2019 | UPDATED: 14:09 08 October 2019

Ryan Riley of Life Kitchen which looks at ways to tempt the tastebuds of people whose sense of taste has dimmed  Photo submitted

Ryan Riley of Life Kitchen which looks at ways to tempt the tastebuds of people whose sense of taste has dimmed Photo submitted

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Discover how Norfolk research could help your 
health, if social media is bad for teenagers, how to tempt people who find food doesn't taste of anything - and much more in the Norwich Science Festival, October 18-26.

Molly Case found her family life and professional life moved into the same space when her father was taken into the ward where she worked as a nurse  Photo submittedMolly Case found her family life and professional life moved into the same space when her father was taken into the ward where she worked as a nurse Photo submitted

Before worrying that your teenager is always glued their phone, find out if it's good - or bad - for their mental health.

Hashtag: My Perfect World is a discussion for teens and parents to discover if social media really is to blame for poor teenage mental health. TV and radio presenter and Young Minds Ambassador, Katie Thistleton, explores whether living our lives through our online profiles is a force for good or a path to unhappiness. She's joined by Dr Radha Modgil (GP, Radio 1 and TV presenter and mental health campaigner), Amy Orben (University of Oxford) and Dr Harry Dyer (UEA).

Katie says: "I'm really pleased we're going to be talking about social media at Norwich Science Festival. Young people can't escape social media, it's going to be a part of their lives, and parents can't escape it either.

"We all need better educating so we can use it wisely and to benefit, not hinder our mental health," adds Katie. Join the talk at The Forum from 7.30pm-8.30pm, October 22, suitable for teenagers and upwards.

Ginny Smith has tips and tricks to help us with our memory  Photo submittedGinny Smith has tips and tricks to help us with our memory Photo submitted

Join Life Kitchen at The Assembly House on October 19 (11am-12pm) to explore how to reignite the spark of eating enjoyment in a special event for people undergoing chemotherapy, and their families. The sense of taste is often lost or dulled as a side effect of chemotherapy and the session will share tips for restoring some pleasure in food, with clever combinations of ingredients often using the fifth taste, umami, to heighten and amplify the flavour.

Presenter Rachael Riley says they are thrilled to be bringing the talk and demo to The Assembly House for Norwich Science Festival.

"We started by travelling around the country to reach as many people as possible so to be doing events such as this is a great honour and we are looking forward to seeing everyone. Life Kitchen is about bringing taste and flavour back to people who have an altered sense of taste during or after their cancer treatment, so if you have been affected by a loss of taste in any way please come down and see what we do."

If it's your memory you're worried about or whether you can trust your memory, join Psychology and Neuroscience specialist, author and presenter Ginny Smith at Norwich School on October 20, 12.30pm-1.30pm. She explains what happens in the brain when we learn and create memories in an interactive show including cutting-edge research, plus some tips and tricks to help us make the most of our memory.

Katie Thistleton brings a discussion of social media and teenagers' health to Norwich Science Festival at the Forum, Norwich, Tueday, October 22, 7.30pm–8.30pm.   Photo Owen Vincent mKatie Thistleton brings a discussion of social media and teenagers' health to Norwich Science Festival at the Forum, Norwich, Tueday, October 22, 7.30pm–8.30pm. Photo Owen Vincent m

Ginny says she is excited to be performing at Norwich Science festival again: "I am always pleased to share my love of science, and particularly the brain, with everyone."

More information at www.norwichsciencefestival.co.uk

You may also like to see during Norwich Science Festival....

October 20

How to Treat People: A Nurse at Work

With Molly Case

Waterstones, Castle Street, Norwich

Sunday 20 October

5pm-6pm

Cost: £5

Age: 12+

You may also want to watch:

Book: norwichsciencefestival.co.uk

Nurse and author Molly Case introduces us to patients with whom we share the pain, but also the experience of illness when life is at its most vivid. She faced her father being admitted to the high dependency unit on which she worked, confronting care when two worlds - the professional and the personal - suddenly collide.

October 23

Push: My Father, Polio, and Me

National Centre for Writing, Dragon Hall, King Street, Norwich,

7.30pm-8.30pm

£8

Age: 12+

Book: norwichsciencefestival.co.uk

Push tells the story of a rower struck by polio, never to walk again. Of newlyweds separated a life on hold. Sarah Passingham's great book is brought to life through film, dance, and live reading. Come face-to-face with a human experience of disability before vaccination eradicated polio in the UK.

October 25

Health and Wellbeing Cafe

The Murderers, 2-8 Timber Hill, Norwich, NR1 3LB

7pm-9pm

Cost: £3

Age: 18+

Book: store.uea.ac.uk

Join the first Health and Wellbeing Café and discover how research in Norfolk could make a difference to future health. Focusing on current research from UEA and the Norwich Research Park, Prof Dylan Edwards (Pro-Vice Chancellor for the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences) and Dr Sarah Hanson (Lecturer in Health Sciences) will discuss the latest in cancer research at UEA. Ask questions, enjoy a drink and dive into the discussion!

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