Logo

Student accommodation block could be demolished and redeveloped in city centre

PUBLISHED: 06:45 22 October 2018 | UPDATED: 15:29 22 October 2018

Mary Chapman Court, which could be knocked down and replaced by new student flats. Pic: Archant.

Mary Chapman Court, which could be knocked down and replaced by new student flats. Pic: Archant.

Archant

A student accommodation block and disused car park could be demolished in Norwich city centre.

A model showing how Mary Chapman Court off Duke Street could be redeveloped. PHOTO: Dan GrimmerA model showing how Mary Chapman Court off Duke Street could be redeveloped. PHOTO: Dan Grimmer

The Norwich University of the Arts (NUA) is seeking permission to knock down Mary Chapman Court on Duke Street.

It wants to redevelop the site to include a new lecture theatre, teaching facilities and 100 rooms for first year students.

The plans could also see the riverside section of the development transformed into a public area with seating and access ramps.

Hudson Architects, on behalf of the NUA, said in the application that the riverside space could become a potential theatre setting.

Mary Chapman Court, UEA. Photo: Google MapsMary Chapman Court, UEA. Photo: Google Maps

If approved, the plans would see 119 existing student rooms demolished, as well as a basement car park.

Hudson Architects said: “The university has a pressing need for further teaching space, including a large lecture theatre with capacity to deliver teaching to whole course cohorts, and ancillary teaching rooms, staff offices and tutorial space.”

The lecture theatre will be located on the ground floor of the building. It will also serve as a performing arts teaching space.

Student accommodation will be on the upper floors of the premises.

The proposals were first revealed earlier this year, but NUA has now submitted a planning application to Norwich City Council.

Mary Chapman court was built in the 1970s and purchased from the city council in September this year.

The site was the location of ironworks Barnard, Bishops and Barnard from the mid 19th century.

Back in July, Anthony Hudson, director of Hudson Architects, said he hoped the scheme would be complete by 2020.

However, he added: “The view for us is that it only makes sense if we can get building complete for the beginning of the academic year.

“So we would like it to be 2020, but we know the vagaries of getting a building on site means it might be 2021.”

What do you think of the plans?

E mail your views to luke.powell@archant.co.uk

Latest Articles

Meet the Editor

Caroline Culot

Email
Twitter

I am the property editor in charge of delivering some exciting and informative content within Archant’s varied titles. We have 16-17 pages of stories, features and columns in the EDP Property supplement out every Friday free in your EDP so please don’t miss it.

Most Read