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Historic England concerned over plans to build near 15th century ruins

PUBLISHED: 10:56 19 October 2018 | UPDATED: 10:56 19 October 2018

Historic England has expressed concern about the potential impact to the remains of Drayton Old Lodge, which is a Grade II* listed building. Picture: Katy Walters

Historic England has expressed concern about the potential impact to the remains of Drayton Old Lodge, which is a Grade II* listed building. Picture: Katy Walters

Katy Walters

Historic England has raised concern over proposals for 30 new homes next to the remains of a 15th century lodge in Drayton.

Drayton Lodge business and conference centre. 
Picture: Bill SmithDrayton Lodge business and conference centre. Picture: Bill Smith

Wilson Developments Ltd could next week receive planning permission to build the properties at Drayton Old Lodge, off Drayton High Road.

The scheme would also see Drayton Lodge, which was erected in 1914, converted from a business centre into five dwellings.

But Historic England has expressed concern about the potential impact to the remains of Drayton Old Lodge, which is a Grade II* listed building.

The structure, which is believed to have been built as a fortified manor house in the 15th century, sits to the south east of the new lodge building.

Historic England said: “A further concern is the long term impact of the development upon Old Lodge, in particular, how to manage the repair and on-going management of the site should a development take place.

“We also have a concern about ownership of the monument going forward.”

The application will go before Broadland District Council’s planning committee on October 24,

A heritage statement included with the application said the lodge was built before 1437 by Sir John Fastolf, who was a “notable soldier and trusted associate of the Regent of France.”

It was later passed to the Paston family, but was described as being ruined by 1465 in the infamous Paston Letters.

The lodge was once a two-storey building with four round towers at the corners. However, all that remains today is a single storey and parts of the four external walls.

Broadland’s historic environment officer agreed with concerns raised by Historic England.

The officer said a stabilisation scheme for the ruin must be “the most important aspect” of any consent granted.

A report which will go before Broadland’s planning committee recommends the application for approval.

However, it states that approval should be subject to a programme of repairs and maintenance of the ruin, together with details of its future ownership being agreed on.

• For more information, search application number 20180236 at Broadland’s planning website.

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