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Dip in desire for European getaways ahead of Brexit - but what might it actually mean?

PUBLISHED: 15:45 01 April 2019 | UPDATED: 15:52 01 April 2019

Fewer Brits are going abroad due to unanswered questions about Brexit. Photo: Julien Behal/PA Wire

Fewer Brits are going abroad due to unanswered questions about Brexit. Photo: Julien Behal/PA Wire

PA Archive/Press Association Images

For plenty of Brits, the uncertainty around Brexit is enough to make a holiday at home particularly appealing.

Travel firms around the country say that customer demand for European getaways over the next six months - the peak summer season - is falling, which some experts have put down to unanswered questions around Brexit.

A spokesperson for Thomas Cook travel agents said falling ticket sales were an “industry challenge”, and not specific to them.

Easyjet chief executive Johan Lundgren also told the BBC said that they were seeing “softness in both UK and Europe”, which they put down to Brexit.

And a TUI travel agents spokesperson said they had seen significant growth in destinations such as Egypt and Turkey.

Norwich International airport will see less travellers as airlines report decline in sales. Photo: Simon FinlayNorwich International airport will see less travellers as airlines report decline in sales. Photo: Simon Finlay

So we asked people in Norwich what they made of it - and whether they planned to travel to Europe this summer.

Linda Grey, 62 and from Norwich, said: “I don’t want to book somewhere and lose all my money. We’re going to holiday at the Lake District this year. We will go abroad when this sorry mess is finished.”

But Colin Whitely, 56 and from Costessey, who works as an electrician, said he disagreed.

“Brexit won’t stop me going on holiday,” he said. “I don’t think it’s ever going to happen so why stop going abroad?”

Easyjet have reported of a 8pc decrease and £275m loss already this year. Photo credit: Barry Batchelor/PA WireEasyjet have reported of a 8pc decrease and £275m loss already this year. Photo credit: Barry Batchelor/PA Wire

Mum-of-one Amber Skelling, 32, who lives on Magpie Road in Norwich, said: “ I can’t afford to go abroad at the minute but want to take my son on holiday one day, I hope Brexit won’t make it more difficult.”

And student Ben Wilson, 23, said Brexit wouldn’t stop him enjoying a lads holiday.

“What will be will be,” he said. “I don’t think anyone knows what the implications are going to be when/if we do leave. Until then, it’s business as usual for me.”

Easyjet has reported a decline of 8pc in its selling figures, with a £275m loss for the first half of this year, with Ryanair stating that they have had its first quarterly loss since March 2014.

The TUI spokesperson said: “No matter what happens with Brexit we will operate our holidays to the EU as planned and customers can continue to book their holidays with us with confidence.”

Travelling outside the UK after Brexit will mean changes you may not have considered - deal or no deal.

Passport information - Travelling after Brexit means your passport must be valid for a minimum of six months from the date of arrival to a European destination.

Travel insurance - In the event that we leave the EU with no-deal, the usual European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) will no longer be valid. Travellers will need to take out comprehensive travel insurance, no matter where they are travelling.

Car hire - Hiring a car in Europe will require an up-to-date international driving permit (IUP) alongside a full UK driving licence.

Mobile use - When travelling within the EU there are currently no roaming charges, but this may change after Brexit. Check with your mobile provider for their call/data charges.

Travelling with pets - A no-deal Brexit will render your pet’s UK-issued passport invalid for travel in the EU.

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