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‘Lucky view of a rare sight’: Nesting Stone Curlew captured live on webcam

PUBLISHED: 09:25 22 April 2020 | UPDATED: 07:46 01 May 2020

A stone curlew

A stone curlew

Archant

Bird watchers across the county have been enjoying a “rare sight” as the Norfolk Wildlife Trust (NWT) have captured a species of bird nesting on its live webcam.

The Stone Curlew, which migrates from southern Europe during the summer season, has returned to its nesting spot in the Brecks, on Weeting Heath and the Norfolk Wildlife Trust have captured it live on webcam. Photo: Norfolk Wildlife TrustThe Stone Curlew, which migrates from southern Europe during the summer season, has returned to its nesting spot in the Brecks, on Weeting Heath and the Norfolk Wildlife Trust have captured it live on webcam. Photo: Norfolk Wildlife Trust

The Stone Curlew, which migrates from southern Europe during the summer season, has returned to its nesting spot in the Brecks, on Weeting Heath and the NWT have caught it on camera.

James Symonds, Weeting Heath warden at the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, said: “People are getting a lucky view of a very rare sight of a Stone Curlew on the nest. It’s fantastic.

“There are 300 breeding pairs across Britain and two thirds of those are in Breckland.

“We are lucky to have four breeding pairs on site at the moment. They nest on the bare ground and these birds have been there for about a week.

The Stone Curlew. Photo: Elizabeth DackThe Stone Curlew. Photo: Elizabeth Dack

“But Stone Curlews are interesting because the male and female share parental care and they will incubate the eggs for around 26 days.

“Each will take it in turn and the changeover on the eggs roughly every 40 minutes.

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“With a bit of luck, we will fledge some chicks.”

The Stone Curlew. Photo: Elizabeth DackThe Stone Curlew. Photo: Elizabeth Dack

This exciting news comes after a species recovery project has been successful in increasing the population of the bird since its numbers dwindled around the 80s.

Mr Symonds added: “Stone Curlews are a very rare bird in Britain which migrate in the summer from Southern Europe. They come to Breckland in South Norfolk to breed every year.

“Before they were more widespread and numerous, but they went into bid decline and the population got very low around the 80s.

“But a species recovery project did a lot of work to protect nests.

The Stone Curlew. Photo: Elizabeth DackThe Stone Curlew. Photo: Elizabeth Dack

“By working with farmers and telling them were nests were, they were able to safeguards a lot of birds, luckily since then the population has somewhat recovered.

“This is a great opportunity for people to tune in at home, if they go on our website they can find a link to the web cam.”

For more information or to watch the nesting Stone Curlew live, visit the NWT here, https://www.norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk/news-and-articles/cameras/weeting-heath-webcam


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