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Anti-fur campaigners launch protest outside Ginger designer store

PUBLISHED: 12:17 17 February 2020 | UPDATED: 12:17 17 February 2020

The protest with campaigners against the use of fur, standing outside Ginger womenswear store, Timber Hill, capture the attention of people walking by. Pic: Archant

The protest with campaigners against the use of fur, standing outside Ginger womenswear store, Timber Hill, capture the attention of people walking by. Pic: Archant

A mini protest took place outside the Ginger designer womenswear store in Norwich after the shop was found to be selling items using fox and rabbit fur.

Ginger in Timberhill. Picture: Archant LibraryGinger in Timberhill. Picture: Archant Library

Protesters stood with placards outside the store in Timber Hill at the weekend, asking shoppers to sign a petition against the use of fur in clothing. The clothes business run by the Kingsley family includes Ginger and men's outfitters Hatters, in White Lion Street and Jonathan Trumbull, in St Stephen's Street.

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Designer brand Woolrich has this parka with a rabbit fur trim, for sale for £1,020 at Ginger. Woolrich states it only uses fur from sustainable and traceable sources. Pic: GingerDesigner brand Woolrich has this parka with a rabbit fur trim, for sale for £1,020 at Ginger. Woolrich states it only uses fur from sustainable and traceable sources. Pic: Ginger

They are currently selling a women's wrap trimmed with a grey fox fur collar for £146,30, gloves trimmed with fox fur for £46,20, a £1,020 parka with a rabbit fur hood and a £950 black coat with a silver fox fur collar. Men's clothing being sold by the firm includes a parka with a racoon fur trim for £622.97 and an army blouson, trimmed with blue fox fur for £629.27.

Victoria Petchey, who runs the Norwich Anti-Fur campaign, told this newspaper: "I don't understand why wearing the beautiful skin of a dead animal is considered luxurious and high-end fashion, but that's my opinion.

"The same goes for leather, silk, wool and feathers. I don't agree in any skin of an animal being worn but to take on the battle of 'stop wearing leather' doesn't go down well in our society."

The items being sold using real fur are from brands including Marella, Woolrich, Mackage and Moose Knuckles.

Each states their fur policy on their websites, which includes only using fur from 'sustainable and traceable sources.' US-based Woolrich states it 'follows stringent ethical policies for the use of any animal-derived materials in its products....we respect and believe that choosing to wear garments made with fur, down or other animal-derived material is a personal decision. Woolrich John Rich & Bros recognises that animals are sensitive beings and should be respected and always be treated in such a way that they do not suffer.

'The company's approach is to ensure that animal-derived products are sourced from animals that have not been subjected to any unfair or unethical practices, The company uses only animal-derived products from suppliers that can prove that the fur has been obtained according to the international rules for animal care and protection and the utmost ethical and legal practices.'

A spokesman for the stores Ginger, Hatters and Jonathan Trumbull declined to comment. All stores also stock several faux fur items.

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