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Norwich pub reopens after six-figure refurbishment

PUBLISHED: 09:22 30 May 2019 | UPDATED: 14:50 30 May 2019

The Rushcutters Arms in Norwich reopened its doors on Friday 24 May, after a six-figure refurbishment that created a number of new jobs. Pictures: Rushcutters

The Rushcutters Arms in Norwich reopened its doors on Friday 24 May, after a six-figure refurbishment that created a number of new jobs. Pictures: Rushcutters

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The Rushcutters Arms in Norwich reopened its doors after a six-figure refurbishment which has created a number of new jobs.

The venue on Yarmouth Road, which reopened on Friday, May 27 has been significantly refurbished to create a "cosy, country pub that offers a home from home setting".

Ben Cooke, general manager at the Rushcutters Arms, said: "Our guests are at the heart of what we do, so it was great to be able to mark the reopening with the local community.

"We've already had great feedback on the refurbishment, across the interior areas as well as the new planting, lighting and furniture that has been incorporated to enhance our exterior spaces.

"The team and I can't wait to welcome new and returning visitors to the pub very soon to show off even better surroundings where they can enjoy our fantastic take on British Classic Food and carefully curated fine wines and cask ales."

The Rushcutters Arms in Norwich reopened its doors on Friday 24 May, after a six-figure refurbishment that created a number of new jobs. Pictures: RushcuttersThe Rushcutters Arms in Norwich reopened its doors on Friday 24 May, after a six-figure refurbishment that created a number of new jobs. Pictures: Rushcutters

The Grade II listed pub has stood on the banks of the River Yare since the 16th century.

Records show it was known as the Three Tuns in the mid-19th century, before being renamed as the Thorpe Gardens Inn in the late 1800s.

It was under this name that the pub played a key role following one of the biggest rail disasters in Norfolk's history.

On Thursday, September 10, 1874, two trains collided head-on near to the pub, killing at least 25 people.

The pub was turned into a makeshift mortuary as the dead and dying were brought inside to an area that now forms part of the dining room.

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Its role in the aftermath of the accident has since led to rumours that the building is haunted.

It underwent another name change in 1969 to The Boat and Bottle, and then to the Rushcutters Arms in 1985.

It had a £120,000 refurbishment in November 2015 and has a large garden and patio area with seating available for customers.

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