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Former Salvation Army hut goes up for sale for £20,000

PUBLISHED: 06:00 04 February 2020 | UPDATED: 09:02 04 February 2020

This Salvation Army hut is for sale at auction. Pic: William H Brown.

This Salvation Army hut is for sale at auction. Pic: William H Brown.

A former Salvation Army hut, once used to give refreshments to those in need, is coming under the hammer at auction.

This Salvation Army hut is for sale at auction. Pic: William H Brown.This Salvation Army hut is for sale at auction. Pic: William H Brown.

You can buy a slice of Norfolk heritage in the form of this building which is situated in a rural location in Wood Dalling. near Reepham.

The current owner has previously rented out the building as a workshop or for storage. It's being auctioned at the Dunston Hall Hotel by William H Brown on February 20 at 11.30am for a guide price of £20,000-£30,000.

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This Salvation Army hut is for sale at auction. Pic: William H Brown.This Salvation Army hut is for sale at auction. Pic: William H Brown.

Victoria Reek, auction manager, said: "The site may now offer numerous opportunities either to restore and retain the building as it is or apply for change of use with Broadland District Council.

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"This property offers access to the market town of Reepham where an array of local amenities can be found and road links to the city of Norwich and the North Norfolk coast. This would ideally suit a builder or developer looking for a project."

The original Salvation Army huts were used to provide refreshments and as a place of rest for soldiers. Cups of tea were served and home-made cakes as well as there being writing materials provided for those who wanted to compose a letter to be sent home. This in particular kept soldiers in contact with friends and family and helped with the isolation and reminded them of who they were and what they had to go home for. Writing

materials were supplied for free and postcards were also available. All letters had to be read before they were sent to make sure there was no mention of places or any military secrets.

Soldiers often

wrote a 'goodbye' letter just before they went to the front line, to be sent if they didn't make it back.

One hut recorded using over 2,500 sheets of paper every weekend. There was often music and minor repairs offered - such as the sewing on of a button or darning a sock. Most important was that every soldier was made to feel welcome and special. Often huts were manned by a married couple and done on a voluntary basis.

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