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'Fast fashion needs to stop': Designer asks shoppers to 'reconsider' purchases

PUBLISHED: 15:16 25 October 2019 | UPDATED: 15:16 25 October 2019

The 32-year-old urged consumers to reconsider single-wear clothing from high street brands. Picture: Contribited by Aesthetic Laundry.

The 32-year-old urged consumers to reconsider single-wear clothing from high street brands. Picture: Contribited by Aesthetic Laundry.

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An independent fashion designer from Norfolk has urged shoppers to stray from buying single-wear clothing from fast fashion brands.

Heidi Michelle May who hails from Thompson, near Watton launched clothing brand Aesthetic Laundry in 2014. Picture: Contributed by Aesthetic LaundryHeidi Michelle May who hails from Thompson, near Watton launched clothing brand Aesthetic Laundry in 2014. Picture: Contributed by Aesthetic Laundry

Heidi Michelle May who hails from Thompson, near Watton, launched the clothing brand Aesthetic Laundry in 2014 after battling with negative body image and high street store sizing.

Since then, the business has expanded to a studio in London and the 32-year-old is now encouraging consumers to reconsider their purchases to end "disposable fashion".

According to the House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee, the way clothes are made, used and disposed of is "unsustainable".

An excerpt of the 2019 report, said: "Our biggest retailers have 'chased the cheap needle around the planet', commissioning production in countries with low pay, little trade union representation and weak environmental protection.

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"We recognise that fast fashion has made it affordable for everyone to experience the pleasure of style, design and the latest trends. We were told however that the most sustainable garment is the one we already own and that repairing, rewearing, reusing and renting are preferable to recycling or discarding clothes."

Miss May agreed with the report, adding: "Fashion is becoming disposable and we are reaching a point where it just needs to stop. Some fast fashion companies are launching products and collections every three weeks, giving consumers all the more reason to wear products once and then throw them away.

"The amount of product being disposed in landfill is incredibly alarming and it needs the retail industry to act quickly to make a changes.

"I'm not saying shy away from the high street at all, sometimes we don't have the budgets to constantly buy from independent shops, but as long as we are considering the number of times are you are going to wear it and do you really need it, that will definitely be a great starting point."

The fashion designer, who studied at Wayland Community High School said by shopping in small businesses "you can guarantee no one in the production chain is suffering" and have better quality products.

"People are being paid a fair wage, customers are receiving garments which are made well and will last."

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