Barton Turf boatyard’s new heart start machine

Alex Mayer from the British Heart Foundation handing over the defibrillator to Eric Bishop from Cox's Boatyard at Barton Turf. Pic: SUBMITTED

A new life-saving defibrillator is now stationed at Cox's Boatyard at Barton Turf.

The portable device can be used by a member of the public to help restart the heart when someone has a cardiac arrest, by delivering a controlled electric shock through the chest wall.

For every minute that passes without defibrillation, chances of survival decrease by around 10pc and research shows that applying a controlled shock within five minutes of collapse provides the best possible chances of survival.

Boatyard manager Eric Bishop said they contributed half the cost of the machine, from the British Heart Foundation, because there were 'dedicated to helping our customers, visitors to the Broads, and the local community.'

Although automated instructions enabled anyone to use it in an emergency, they would also be arranging courses for local people to attend, so the best possible use could be made of the of equipment.


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'We know that every minute counts when someone has a heart attack, so this type of equipment is particularly important in rural and remote areas, which can be a long way from help. We hope it never needs to be used, but if it does, it's great to know it may save a life,' he added.

Similar equipment was used in the high profile case of footballer Fabrice Muamba who collapsed during a match.

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Alex Mayer, Norfolk British Heart Foundation fundraising manager, said fewer than one in 10 of the 30,000 people suffering a cardiac arrest outside of hospital lived long enough to leave hospital alive - but many more could be saved if more defibrillators were available in public places.

If other organisations would like to apply for similar lifesaving equipment, visit bhf.org.uk/defib.

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