45 trees on Norwich housing estate to be cut down

45 trees are being cut down on a Norwich housing estate. Picture Gary Crisp

45 trees are being cut down on a Norwich housing estate. Picture Gary Crisp - Credit: Gary Crisp

A total of 45 trees on a Norwich housing estate are going to be cut down after their roots were deemed to be too invasive.

45 trees are being cut down on a Norwich housing estate. Picture Gary Crisp

45 trees are being cut down on a Norwich housing estate. Picture Gary Crisp - Credit: Gary Crisp

The trees, which are mainly Redwoods, on Winchcomb Road and the surrounding area are set to be removed in the next month after a decision by Norwich City Council to phase the species out.

The trees will be replaced by other species, including Callery Pear and Field Maple, which have been deemed as a better fit to city living.

A spokesperson for Norwich City Council said: 'Due to continuous issues with the invasive root systems of trees in this area, which are mainly Redwoods, we've taken the decision to remove them.

'Once removed, the area will be replanted with suitable species.

'We've placed posters on the selected trees to let the local communities know our intentions so they can get in touch with the relevant team at the council if they want to discuss matters further.'

Gary Crisp, a resident of the road, said he understands why the council are removing the tress but doesn't get the reason they were planted in the first place.

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'If they are going to cause problems it is better to pull them up now because they could cause a lot more damage to the road and the paths but if they plan to take the whole trunk and roots up that may cost a lot of money,' said the 62-year-old. 'I also don't understand why someone would authorise the planting of the trees when they knew they would cause problems in the near future.'

The maintenance engineer also said that he his happy that the council are replacing the trees as they add something to the city.

He added: 'They absorb carbon dioxide and produce oxygen and there is of course there aesthetic quality.

'Of course at this time of year it is sometimes inconvenient when they drop their leaves but I think that it is a small price to pay when you think of what we get from them.'

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