Six of the Best: Cultural highlights not to miss this week

The Wind In The Willows will get a special staging at Norwich Theatre Royal The Wind In The Willows will get a special staging at Norwich Theatre Royal

Monday, August 4, 2014
8:39 AM

A special production of The Wind In The Willows, featuring some returning local stars who’ve gone on to screen success, tenor Joshua Ellicott leads a First World War centenary concert, the chance to experience a Night at the Cinema in 1914, fun family antics from Theo the Mouse and global sounds and beats from Rupa & The April Fishes. SIMON PARKIN picks six cultural highlights not to miss this week.

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CONCERT

First World War Centenary Concert

Holkham Hall, August 4, 7pm, £18, 01328 713111, www.holkham.co.uk

A special addition to Holkham’s chamber music series to commemorate the Centenary of the First World War. Tenor Joshua Ellicott, accompanied by pianist Paul Janes, a soloist with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, will perform songs by Bridge, Finzi, Ireland, Poulenc and others including Haydn Wood’s Roses of Picardy. The programme will also include readings by Joshua Ellicott of a selection of his great uncle Jack’s letters written from the front back home to his parents in Lancashire. Joshua was given the entire collection of letters by his grandfather, Harry Ellicott Jack Ellicott was born in Lancashire in 1896. He died on 12th August 1916, just a few weeks after arriving on the front. Tickets also include entry to the exhibition Duty Calls: Holkham 1914 to 1918.

FILM

A Night at the Cinema in 1914

Cinema City, Norwich, August 4 (6.30pm), 0871 9025724, www.picturehouses.co.uk/Abbeygate Cinema, Bury St Edmunds, August 4 (6.30pm), 0871 9025722, www.abbeygatecinema.co.uk

Marking the centenary of the start of the First World War, a glorious miscellany of comedies, adventure films, travelogues and newsreels recreates a typical night out at the cinema in 1914. Among the highlights of this compilation from the BFI archives are a quirky comic short about a face-pulling competition, a sensational episode of the American film serial The Perils of Pauline, an early aviation display, scenes of suffragettes protesting at Buckingham Palace and Allied troops celebrating Christmas at the Front. There is also an anti-German animation and an early sighting of one of cinema’s greatest icons. The BFI also commissioned composer and pianist Stephen Horne, one of Britain’s leading accompanists of silent film, to create a new improvised score which reflects the time and spirit in which the films were made.

MUSIC

Rupa & The April Fishes

Norwich Arts Centre, August 5, 8pm, £8, 01603 660352, www.norwichartscentre.co.uk

San Francisco crew whose rustic, rootsy sound takes its cues from across the globe: from slinky Latin American tangos to perky hoedowns, as you can hear on its beguiling current album, Build. Their sound that is as difficult to define being pulled from eight years of street parties, festivals and symphonic concerts on three continents, three diverse studio albums, one live album and one string quartet recording in many musical traditions. Rupa sings in French, Spanish, Hindi and English, combining Indian ragas with tango, waltz and bossa nova in a soothing global mish-mash. Support comes from Sunday Driver.

THEATRE

The Wind In The Willows

Norwich Theatre Royal, August 6-9, 7pm, 2pm August 9, £9-£5.50-£9, 01603 630000, www.theatreroyalnorwich.co.uk

Every summer the young people on the Norwich Theatre Royal Arts Courses get the chance to put stagecraft they have learned into practice by starring in a major musical production. This year, the show tells the classic story of Wind In The Willows and marks the 25th anniversary of writer and director David Lambert as the course director. A host of former students will be heading back to Norwich to star alongside this year’s intake including Hunger Games star Sam Claflin, who began his theatrical career in a youth company production of Robinson Crusoe in 2003, and his Games of Thrones starring younger brother Joe, who starred as Sinbad in a youth production. Endeavour regular Jack Bannon, and the duo of Carl Prekopp and Nic Jackman who starred in the acclaimed Donmar Warehouse production of Roots will also be among those treading the boards on home ground again.

FAMILY

Theo the Mouse

St George’s Theatre, Great Yarmouth, August 6, 2pm, £9, 01493 331484, www.stgeorgestheatre.com

Theo the Mouse and his best friend Wendy drop in for afternoon of pure family fun and laughter in this show featuring the latest loveable creation from Wink Taylor, the writer of ITVs Sooty and Basil Brush. Perfect holiday entertainment it’s a show filled to the brim with jokes, songs and magic is suitable for any little person aged over two. Wink has long been associated with Sooty and Basil with whom he tours and films extensively. He hopes the wonderfully loveable and just so slightly cheeky Theo will also soon become every child’s favourite friend. It seems to be going well so far; the show was recently nominated for the Fringe First Award for Best Family Entertainment at the Buxton Festival.

THEATRE

Noises Off/Deathtrap

St Edmund’s Hall, Cumberland Road, Southwold, August 4-16, 8pm, 5pm matinees August 7/9/14/16, £17.50-£17.50-£11 (£12-£10 matinees), 01502 722572, www.southwoldtheatre.org/Jubilee Hall, Crabbe Street, Aldeburgh, August 5-9, 8pm, 5pm August 9, £17.50-£14 (£12-£10 matinee), 01728 454022, www.southwoldtheatre.org

The Southwold/Aldeburgh summer theatre season continues with productions of Michael Frayn’s comedy about a touring theatre company, which was recently voted the nation’s second favourite play, being staged at St Edmund’s Hall then at the Jubilee Hall in Aldeburgh from August 19-23. Meanwhile Ira Levin’s edge-of-the-seat thriller Deathtrap is currently at St Edmund’s Hall in Southwold until August 2 before transferring to the Jubilee Hall in Aldeburgh from August 5-9. A past-it playwright reads a cracking new thriller script written by an unknown author and lures him to his lonely country home where life begins to imitate art...

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