Waveney Valley: Beccles is still the place to go for chub

by Dave Gladwell
Thursday, February 14, 2013
10:44 AM

The upper river is slowly returning to a fishable state, but it’s been a hard job to find anyone fishing it or even at Beccles on Sunday.

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Although the colour has begun to fall out, fish were being caught for those few prepared to sit it out.

Up at Scole Bridge, with the water having dropped away, one could see downstream the newly scraped out dykes and relief channels giving plenty of hope to fry for escape routes out the heavy flow.

Willows had also come out, rotting into the water and now flowing down to the 2000 made riffles. Much has been done to re-enliven this pretty stretch as it wends its way over the meadows.

The tidal water has begun to turn up some quality bags and fish during the week.

Becoming ever more noticeable is the presence of chub around Beccles.

The swimfeeder and red maggots have just produced a pair from the swim below the Yacht Station of 5lb 2oz and 4lb 11oz. This size appears to be the largest taken below Dunburgh to date.

The habitat must be suiting the species with an abundant food chain as 2lb has been more of the biggest run as far down as the North Cove Club waters and Worlingham for the last couple of years.

With its Avon and Severn type qualities of flow and depth, anglers are beginning to wonder if there is a change afoot that will change the shape of roach and bream orientated angling on the way.

In Diss at the small Stables Gallery, set behind the Cornhall, is an exhibition of around 40 oils based mostly of the non-tidal River but the Ellingham one is a brilliant piece too.

Probably never before has any local painter been able to capture and express the beauty of the River we have around us so sensitively as Peter Knights of Diss.

A trip to look at this postman’s pictures are a must for all those that like or love the Waveney, as the viewing opens the eyes to seeing the watercourse in clean clear colours you will recognise as exactly what is there.

It is a view expressed in the visitors’ book by one viewer as “stunning”.

Also there are some sketches and photographs. Open until March 2, it is free entry during the day with demonstrations of how he does his paintings on February 20 and 27 from 1.30-4pm.

Commercial fisheries have all been good value for money with plenty of fish taking the bait, and shoals of silver beginning to pack themselves together.

Carp of all sizes have fed with Marsh Trail C Lake soon coming into form alongside Aldeby Fishery too.

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