Paralympic gold medallist David Weir will be awarded the Freedom of the City of London today.

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Weir won gold in the 800m, 1,500m, 5,000m and marathon at London 2012 to go alongside the two golds he picked up in the Beijing 2008 Paralympics.

The 33-year-old, of Wallington, Surrey, will receive the award at the Guildhall in London.

Others to have received the ancient honour, which dates back to the 13th century, include singer Annie Lennox, Sir Terry Wogan and writer JK Rowling.

Many of the honour’s traditional privileges, such as the freedom to drive sheep over London Bridge, no longer exist, a City of London spokesman said.

Lord Mayor of the City of London Roger Gifford said: “This summer London was proud to be the backdrop for some of the greatest moments in sport, including David Weir powering his way to gold.

“Paralympians have revolutionised Paralympic sport - breaking down barriers and pushing the boundaries of possibility, inspiring a generation.”

A new grants scheme - called the City Sporting Chance - is also being launched by the City of London Corporation’s charity to help widen sports opportunities for disabled people.

It hopes to reach 1.4 million disabled people in London, 75 per cent of whom do not do exercise.

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