Vision for 3,000 Norwich homes gets the green light

12:47 17 October 2014

Revised plans for the scheme on the Deal Ground and May Gurney sites in Bracondale and Trowse have now been submitted. Pictured: Artist impression

Revised plans for the scheme on the Deal Ground and May Gurney sites in Bracondale and Trowse have now been submitted. Pictured: Artist impression

Supplied

Blueprints to build more than 3,000 homes across Norwich have been given the green light by the planning inspectorate.

Sites across the city have been earmarked for development before 2026, including the Deal Ground at Trowse - which has outline planning permission for up to 670 homes.

Two local plan documents - the site allocations plan and the development management policies plan - have been approved.

The former identifies new sites within the city that, between them, are deemed viable to bring forward 3,000 new dwellings by 2026.

The latter is a set of policies that aim to ensure a consistent and responsible approach to development.

It accounts for factors such as protection of landscape and heritage features, infrastructure, office provision, affordable housing and flood management. In his report, the inspector praised Norwich City Council’s approach to consultation.

Mike Stonard, cabinet member for environment, development and transport, said: “The news that our local plan documents are proved to be sound is very welcome.

“It means we can provide certainty for site developers, which will in turn encourage delivery of homes and jobs for the city.

“Through positive engagement, we now have a local plan that provides the tools needed to grow Norwich in a responsible and sustainable way, while also preserving its unique character.”

These documents join the joint core strategy and Northern city centre area action plan to complete Norwich’s local plan.

Both must be approved by full council before they are adopted.

For details see www.norwich.gov.uk/localplanupdate

14 comments

  • Building houses is the easy part. Water supplies, pressure on doctors and schools. this all adds up. Then there's the third world road network in Norfolk. May all end in tears.

    Report this comment

    Tone the moan

    Sunday, October 19, 2014

  • Only Me claims to talk for the 'public'. Yet the public comments here don't seem to agree with his 'public'.

    Report this comment

    Ruston East

    Saturday, October 18, 2014

  • What an awful council we have. They act against us not for us.

    Report this comment

    Parsnip

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • Without the influence of immigration the population of Norwich and Norfolk would be in decline. The authorities could have made plans to start demolishing some of the eyesore developments and convert to green spaces. When was the last time a new park was built in this country, aside from the Olympic one.

    Report this comment

    Steely Dan

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • There are still the unanswered concerns about adequate infrastructure to meet the needs of the influx of people. The lack of adequate capacity at the N&N is a main concern as they have recently been on black alert again but there are other concerns too. Forget about lots of 'affordable' homes as planners load on levies, etc to pay for their grand schemes. Of course they could use those levies to pay for hospital expansion but we know they won't.

    Report this comment

    andy

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • A direct consequence of the Southern Bypass now the N D R, when it will be replicated more green fields gone forever

    Report this comment

    Albert Cooper

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • It is time that central government stopped dictating housing policy to local councils - Norwich does not want or need extra housing but Norfolk County Council does not have the balls to say no.

    Report this comment

    Norfolk John

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • It was stated that the Martineau lane roundabout was at maximum capacity years ago, so where is all the traffic going?

    Report this comment

    Cuthbert J. Twillie

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • Existing residents will always object Rob, but it never turns out as bad as their over-active imaginations fear. New communities can only be a good thing and that's what's being created to compliment the existing stagnating ones and both benefit.

    Report this comment

    Only Me

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • Green belt, parish meetings, public consultation - they mean nothing. Councils give permission wholesale to large developers, it's not about public interest. Broadland steam rollered Blofield residents views and objections to give permission for various sites.

    Report this comment

    Rob_H

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • Because Derek, the public is generally in favour of the new developments. Like it or not, more housing is needed, not least for our children & grandchildren as we are all living longer so housing is not being freed up as quickly. The generally selfish nimbies that comment on here are not representative of public opinion thankfully.Get on and build them I say.

    Report this comment

    Only Me

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • What with this site and the one at Cringleford there will be no green belt left, how do these building firms manage to planning permission with the public having a say

    Report this comment

    Derek McDonald

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • I have a feeling the wellbeing of the city was not thought of when they came up with this plan. The city does not attract enough revenue and has the lowest rate of pay in the country - if we are going to be able to sustain the growth then the government need to encourage people to pay their own way instead of tackling the lack of homes for non tax payers.

    Report this comment

    Courtisans-House

    Friday, October 17, 2014

  • Sadly in their pursuit of added revenue almost everything is getting the green with absolutely no serious joined up thinking about infrastructure or anything else.

    Report this comment

    Cuthbert J. Twillie

    Friday, October 17, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

property mortgage finder

Property E-edition

cover

Enjoy the Property
E-edition

Read

Mustard TV

Meet the Property Editor

Caroline Culot

email | @CarolineJCulot

I am the property editor in charge of delivering some exciting and informative content within Archant’s varied titles. We have 16-17 pages of stories, features and columns in the EDP Property supplement out every Friday free in your EDP so please don’t miss it.

Ultimate Property E-edition

cover

Enjoy the Ultimate
Property E-edition

Subscribe
Do you have a Question or Problem? Ask our expert for property advice
Police.uk

Crime figures for your area