Major Norwich office block may be partly converted into flats

11:54 23 October 2014

St Crispins House has been put up for sale. Picture: Mike page

St Crispins House has been put up for sale. Picture: Mike page

Copypright Mike Page, All Rights Reserved Before any use is made of this picture, including dispaly, publication, broadcast, syn

A five-storey Norwich office block could be partly converted into luxury penthouses and flats.

St Crispin’s, in Duke Street, is on the market for £4.75m, with around 14 tenant businesses offering the new buyer a £785,000 income in rent.

But agents Arnolds Keys believe there is an opportunity to convert some of the building into flats with panoramic city views, with businesses continuing alongside them until their leases run out or are renewed.

The government has relaxed planning rules in this area, with permitted development rights allowing a change of use from offices to residential introduced for a period of three years from May 30, 2013 to May 30, 2016.

And this could change the face of Norwich, giving new life to unused office space.

Craig Knights, head of commercial and a partner at Arnolds Keys, said: “The permitted development rights policy was borne out of a lack of residential properties and an oversupply of poor quality city centre offices so it solves two problems in one hit.

“In Norwich alone we are currently seeing just over 200,000 sqft of office space, tired offices which were not economically viable for refurbishment, being turned into 247 residential units so it is literally changing the shape of the city.

“The policy is working very well for Norwich which had a lot of poor quality office space which was in a downward spiral.”

St Crispins includes an enclosed atrium on a 1.71 acre site with parking for 33 vehicles and it has its own cafe area and a total of 115,050 sqft of space.

St Crispins was opened in 1976 to provide extra space for Her Majesty’s Stationery Office staff. It is now occupied by The Stationery Office; Banner Business Services, Countrywide Ltd and Central Mortgages among others.

20 comments

  • Calm down Bertie Cooper, it is what it is.

    Report this comment

    Whiley Boy

    Friday, October 24, 2014

  • Seems clear from some of the comments that they have confused St Crispins in Duke Street with Sovereign House in Anglia Square. Presumably, they don't live or work here and have never sullied their Jimmy Choo's by shopping in the "vile" Anglia Square. Good to see dear old Albert still fighting the planning battles of 60 years ago!

    Report this comment

    Red Steepler

    Friday, October 24, 2014

  • An area decimated by our socialist council,thirsting for the new world that doesn't exist,The Inner Link Road Anglia Square and so on

    Report this comment

    Albert Cooper

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • There is an undersupply of homes in Norwich so converting this block into residential use would be a good idea. However, I'm not sure that 'luxury flats' would be appropriate.

    Report this comment

    MattW

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • Erghhhhh please don't convert partall of it into flats, the whole building needs to be knocked down. No to another supermarket, we don't need any more in the city centre, we have 4 new ones being built atm NO MORE. Yes to flats but not in this building as it is vile like most of Anglia Square area. Most will moan but Norwich is running out of space for developments so the only way is up and the higher the building the better

    Report this comment

    Martin P

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • "....luxury penthouses and flats".... Oh please! This is a grubby part of a little city situated on the a*se end to nowhere for heavens sakes. Knightsbridge this aint!! When will the city council (and archant) stop talking as if Norwich is a big player in anything! Its embarassing.

    Report this comment

    Tootyfrooty

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • Tesco's has been far too much of a precence in the Norwich for too long, it's heartwarming to see them losing money, I can't wait to see Tesco metro's closing down to make way for pubs and banks.

    Report this comment

    mr mayhem

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • think its a good idea and needs more vacant offoce blocks to go this way

    Report this comment

    Jbone

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • More flats, just what Norwich needs.

    Report this comment

    Alva

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • All a consequence of the `Inner Link Road including Anglia Suare and the demolition of a third of Norwich to complete what is now a raceway,has anyone,planners socialist council and so on ever apologised...NO

    Report this comment

    Albert Cooper

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • Mosque would be a good idea. Or perhaps a multi-faith Tesco, where all religions could unite under one roof and shop in harmony.

    Report this comment

    Partial Neil

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • To nuke the whole area would be dangerous and highly unlikely. I would advise using normal demolition methods.

    Report this comment

    Whiley Boy

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • Site is too small for a Tesco Superstore, but could push for a Compact and most certainly a Metro.

    Report this comment

    Partial Neil

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • A COMPACT is plausible, although a METRO more likely due to the parking issue. Sourced from Tesco’s internet web page: Tesco EXPRESS: “This format combines a petrol forecourt and convenience store stocking a range of 1,400 products. “ Tesco METRO: “Located in prime high street sites, Metro offers a range of products specially selected to attract town centre shoppers.” Tesco COMPACT: “Our compact stores are designed to offer the range of Tesco superstore products and services on a smaller scale.” Tesco SUPERSTORE: “Our established superstore format continues to attract an increasing number of customers by offering a constantly improving range of products and service in pleasant surroundings.”

    Report this comment

    Partial Neil

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • Just Nuke the whole area and start again, be quicker and maybe cheaper

    Report this comment

    che bramley

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • Nice moosey calling people basic but no grasping the reality that alot of people have cars which is why the roads are so busy. Your not going to fill the place with people who don't have cars. The place is horrible needs knocking down along with those shabby cottages opposite a maizy court and build a multistorey there for the new Tesco.

    Report this comment

    Piranha24

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • Knock it all down and rebuild with a Tesco, or a Sainsbury's. Better yet, knock it down and convert into a bingo hall to replace the one which has now been demolished itself.

    Report this comment

    Whiley Boy

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • Why is it always luxury flats?.

    Report this comment

    mr mayhem

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • Sounds like a good idea, but might as well convert the whole thing and just boot the remaining businesses out. Who cares about car parking? I know a lot of the basic people here cant comprehend this, but not everyone needs or wants a car and they get on just fine!

    Report this comment

    Mooseyt4

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

  • The concept of converting a building with no parking, even partly into flats is insane. People will park in a local car park or street & walk into work. But they do not want to park half a mile or more away from home or pay an extra & large bill to park that far away from home.

    Report this comment

    el84

    Thursday, October 23, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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