An A to Z of Norfolk - 26 words that prove you come from this county

'Drive you steady' - the village signs for Deopham in Norfolk take on the local dialect.
Photo: Bill Smith
Copy: Cat Bartman
For: EDP / DMA
Archant © 2006
(01603) 772434 'Drive you steady' - the village signs for Deopham in Norfolk take on the local dialect. Photo: Bill Smith Copy: Cat Bartman For: EDP / DMA Archant © 2006 (01603) 772434

Wednesday, February 26, 2014
5:17 PM

Local dialects are emerging (loud and proud of their non-regulation vowel sounds and non-standard words) to be studied by brain and language scientists.

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The Norfolk dialect was the first in Britain to be subject of academic research and is still going strong. On Saturday, March 1 the EDP’s Weekend supplement takes a look at how traditional dialect is faring in the modern era.

For an A to Z introduction to larn yarself Norfolk, try this my ol’ bewties, with fond thanks to Fond, the Friends of Norfolk Dialect.

Ax -ask

Bor - friend

Coshies - sweets

Dickey - donkey

Elijahs – string tied round the bottom of a labourer’s trouser legs

Fye-out – clean out.

Gansey – heavy jumper made of oiled wool

Huh - uneven

Imitate - attempt

Jip - aggravation

Knap – to shape flint

Loke – a short lane

Mardle - chat

Nasty particular - fussy

Old year’s night – new year’s eve

Pightle - paddock

Quackle - choke

Raw - angry

Squit - rubbish

Tittamatorter - seesaw

Uppards - upwards

Vacagees – evacuees

Waarmin – badly behaved child

X-ees – truce, in childhood games

Yisty - yesterday

Zackly - exactly

4 comments

  • Cor blast ol partner theres a few wards there thet I hent heard a lately. My Mother always called me a warminn so good to see that one in there as it is not one of the more regular Norfolk words that you tend to see in articles such as this. She didn't use the word raw for angry though she always said she was "suffin savage" when somebody or something had annoyed her.

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    "Bin here all me life"

    Wednesday, February 26, 2014

  • Bishybarnabee - Ladybird (after Bishop Barnanby's red frock coat)

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    GreyOwl54

    Wednesday, February 26, 2014

  • Wot a load of ole squit. I've lived in Norfolk all my 53 years, and my 97 year old grandad for all his, and neither of us have heard of half of those words, let alone ever used them! Far better is the Norfolk Dialect Mug. Some cracking words on there and most of them I hear every day!

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    Tom Jeffries

    Wednesday, February 26, 2014

  • All tnat list proves is access to a book of dialect.Norfolk people will know each other by the use of two little words- that and do, And the fact that they go to B and Coo

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    Daisy Roots

    Wednesday, February 26, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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