‘Worst is over’ after Norfolk villages hit by monsoon-like downpours

The heavy rain that has flooded the railway line at Brundall causing services on Norwich to Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft to be suspended. Picture: Greater Anglia The heavy rain that has flooded the railway line at Brundall causing services on Norwich to Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft to be suspended. Picture: Greater Anglia

Saturday, June 28, 2014
12:28 PM

Forecasters believe the worst of the thundery downpours have passed, after a clutch of east Norfolk villages experienced localised flooding yesterday.

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Localised flooding in Hellesdon. Picture: Lynsey HannantLocalised flooding in Hellesdon. Picture: Lynsey Hannant

Residents in Acle, Caister, Hemsby, Filby, Scratby and Ormesby all reported wild weather yesterday, including thunder, lightning and hail, as well as flooding.

On the A47 at Acle drivers said so much hail had gathered on the road it looked like snow, while others reported flooding on roads in Caister, Martham and routes between Rollesby and Caister.

Heavy showers are expected today with 11mm measured at Marham between noon and 1pm.

But Jim Bacon, managing director at Norwich’s WeatherQuest, said things had calmed since yesterday afternoon.

Localised flooding in Hellesdon. Picture: Lynsey HannantLocalised flooding in Hellesdon. Picture: Lynsey Hannant

“It was much quieter overnight,” he said. “The main rainfall events were during the day time.

“The ability of a fairly sparse observation network to catch the heaviest rain is a pretty big ask.

“The heaviest we recorded was 16.8mm at Norwich Airport.”

While the total could have been higher at locations such as Hemsby, there was no formal observation.

“The totals weren’t extreme, even the Norwich Airport one, but that amount of rain fell in about an hour,” added Mr Bacon.

The amount recorded at Norwich Airport would ordinarily fall over a week.

Mr Bacon said there was a chance of showers today but cloud was moving south with Norfolk drier later.

He added there was a possibility of rain tomorrow, but added: “I don’t think they will be those intense thundery downpours.”

15 comments

  • Staycation? Um, no thanks........

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    Barny

    Saturday, June 28, 2014

  • Daisy Roots I am in total agreement with you. A good read is the Norfolk and Suffolk Weather Book which charts the vagaries of our weather across the decades. The popular view is that extreme weather events, such as those which some parts of the county experiences yesterday, are something new. When in fact they are nothing of the sort. Norwich has been flooded on more than one occasion. The 1912 flooding probably being the most significant. Back in 1843 the storm was so fierce that hail stones broke 700 panes of glass in a factory at Lakenham. In 1888 it snowed in July and was so mild in the December that roses were in flower, primroses were in abundance and strawberries were being picked on Christmas Day. Before we all go into panic mode history shows that coastal and fluvial flooding and coastal erosion have always been with us. It`s just that we now live in a world driven by social media and wall to wall news coverage that events, that we would have normally taken in our stride, are being given more significance than they deserve.

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    BG

    Saturday, June 28, 2014

  • @ Dave. Sir, I believe you should be applauded for this act of unblocking the drain, very public spirited indeed.

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    Urbancommander

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • There is a nice website owned and made by David Booty which has historical weather events by century-big storms not a new phenomenon at all.And one the best descriptions of a thunderstorm in English Lit. is in Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd.

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    Daisy Roots

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • When we had thunderstorms earlier this week , afterwards I went out and cleared the debris from the surface water drains . Everyone should keep the drains near them clear , if only for their own benefit .

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    dragonfly

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • went out on mill lane bradwell, whilst cutting the grass yesterday, thought i would check the surface water drain on the road, completely bunged up with grass cuttings and mud, used a piece of metal flat bar to clean out all the openings, thats half the problem i suspect

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    Dave

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • When these looded roads get high enoug to flood a home, I wonder if the local council could be held responsable due to the lack of maintenance of the drainage system.

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    parkeg1

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • Blister, the photo's show a flood in a road, this is because the local councils don't maintain them properly, the world isn't going to come to an end just because we had a thunder storm.

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    parkeg1

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • Not a drop in Gorleston. Did the wrong thing and put some feed on the lawn. Now got the hose out to water it in!

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    BG

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • Well the Show missed the usual thunderstorms this year by a day-lucky! Surely there is weather like this, in these weeks of June almost every year-seems to me to have been that way since I was a child, so global warming piffle. On the infrastructure-seems to me that whoever is responsible for the drains and sewers in one village needs to be doing a bit of unblocking near a clutch of takeaways-and in one or two other places. They takes our money and...

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    Daisy Roots

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • blister: It rained and we had a few puddles, no need to start building an Ark yet, don't panic!

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    Mr T

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • Vic Sponge, you cannot blame Anglia for the weather, tracks have good drainage, but the undulation of the track means water always find its level. Safety first is the only answer in these cases

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    Derek McDonald

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • Evidence of climate change caused without any doubt by increased car use and aircraft journeys, when will people wake up to the damage we do to our climate

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    blister

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • Anyone who has been in a monsoon will know that we don't get monsoons in East Anglia. Per Vic's comment - anyone who has travelled outside East Anglia will realise just how little is spent on the infrastructure here and how far behind some developed countries we are.

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    wallywalnut

    Friday, June 27, 2014

  • Not “monsoon-like” just heavy rain which is now highlighting serious lack of maintenance by various organisations.

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    Vic Sponge

    Friday, June 27, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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