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Three of Norfolk’s oldest wherry yachts set sail as trio of volunteers pass their training

PUBLISHED: 12:22 20 September 2018 | UPDATED: 12:22 20 September 2018

Kat Gerasimova, Trevor Ellis and Philip Kenworthy receive their certificates from WYC. Photograph by Pam Taylor

Kat Gerasimova, Trevor Ellis and Philip Kenworthy receive their certificates from WYC. Photograph by Pam Taylor

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As Olivia, Norada and White Moth - three of Norfolk’s oldest and most iconic wherry yachts - set sail on one of their last voyages for the year, three volunteers were awarded certificates for passing their crew training.

Olivia (left), Norada (centre) and White Moth.  Photograph by Tobi RadcliffeOlivia (left), Norada (centre) and White Moth. Photograph by Tobi Radcliffe

Onboard Olivia - the oldest of the trio, launched in 1909 - Norada, born in 1912, and White Moth, the last wherry yacht ever, built in 1915, were Trevor Ellis and Philip Kenworthy.

Trevor and Philip passed their initial crew training and will be sailing as basic crew next season.

Kat Geramosiva was also awarded a certificate for reaching the highest level of supervising crew, meaning she can now assist new recruits.

White Moth (left) and Norada viewed from Olivia. Photograph by Pam TaylorWhite Moth (left) and Norada viewed from Olivia. Photograph by Pam Taylor

Joining the trio onboard was a number of Wherry Yacht Charter volunteers whose roles range from skippering to crewing, bookings secretary, maintenance crew, viewing guides and publicity.

The charter is also looking for more volunteers to join the team to help manage its five wherry yachts.

Pam Taylor, Wherry Yacht Charter (WYC) trustee, said: “Volunteering with WYC is a rewarding experience with a serious aim. There really is a role for everyone with the charity.”

Accompanying the three wherries as they left their Wroxham base were two photographers taking pictures for the National Parks Experience Collection. The photographers briefly joined those on board for some action shots of preparing the wherries and winching up the sails.

They then transferred to a day boat to take photographs of all three wherries crossing Wroxham Broad.

After a few circuits of the open water the three wherries re-joined the river to continue their journey to Salhouse Broad.

They then moored together so the volunteers could move from vessel to vessel.

WYC also looks after and sails the pleasure wherries Hathor and Ardea.

Ardea recently returned from a trip to Norwich while Hathor, moored at How Hill until later this month, featured in BBC Radio Norfolk’s Treasure Quest last Sunday when Julie Reinger visited her to find clue number five attached to her life ring.

The Wherry Yacht Charter Charitable Trust is a waterway society and registered charity on the Norfolk and Suffolk broads.

If you would like to join WYC as a volunteer visit www.wherryyachtcharter.org or facebook.com/wherryyachtcharter

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