Viewers in Norwich, King’s Lynn, Yarmouth, Wisbech and Hunstanton still watch black and white TVs

A family in Lowestoft gathers around their television in the early 1950s, at a time when many households were purchasing their first set. A family in Lowestoft gathers around their television in the early 1950s, at a time when many households were purchasing their first set.

Monday, January 6, 2014
11:20 AM

Black and white tellies live on, according to the latest figures from TV Licensing.

To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in.

Vintage viewing

TV Licensing reckons there are 11,000 homes still using a black and white TV.

They include:

Norwich, 36

King’s Lynn, 14

Wisbech, 13

Great Yarmouth, 11

Ely, 10

Hunstanton, 5

While more than 25m of us bought colour TV licences last year, more than 11,000 homes still bought a £49 black and white licence.

Mono lives on in Norwich, where there are 36 sets, King’s Lynn, Great Yarmouth and other parts of the region.

Mark Whitehouse, from TV Licensing, said: “Today’s figures show, even in the digital age, more than 11,000 homes still watch their favourite programmes on black and white televisions.

“We may be on the brink of losing black and white sets to the history books, but older technology will always be replaced by exciting new ways of watching live.”

Colour transmissions began 48 years ago. Since then TV has morphed onto cable, satellite and the internet, with view on demand now available on laptop, tablet and smartphone.

While some nostalgic UK homes remain firmly attached to their trusty black and white TVs, they are now in sharp decline.

At the turn of the millennium there were 212,000 black and white licences issued, but by 2003 that number had shrunk to 93,000.

Just three years later, in 2006, the number was less than 50,000 and today just 11,550 black and white licences remain in force across the UK.

6 comments

  • Hasn't the analogue signal been turned off? How are these still working? Last time I checked a Freeview box needs a scart socket and I'm sure these are pretty scarce on black and white sets.

    Report this comment

    Frank Fryup

    Monday, January 6, 2014

  • Hasn't the analogue signal been turned off? How are these still working? Last time I checked a Freeview box needs a scart socket and I'm sure these are pretty scarce on black and white sets.

    Report this comment

    Frank Fryup

    Monday, January 6, 2014

  • Going by the poor quality of the digital signal some time your lucky to get a picture at all that alone a black and white one.

    Report this comment

    ggj666

    Monday, January 6, 2014

  • How are you sure that people with colour sets are still claiming that they watch black and white sets?

    Report this comment

    MIKEJ

    Monday, January 6, 2014

  • Hasn't the analogue signal been turned off? How are these still working? Last time I checked a Freeview box needs a scart socket and I'm sure these are pretty scarce on black and white sets.

    Report this comment

    Frank Fryup

    Monday, January 6, 2014

  • If these black&white TV viewers can still get an analogue signal then I'll join them! I wish I could get any picture - most of the time we've got none with spitting digital. 'Great' new technology with thousands of channels but we can't get the basics of BBC and ITV that we got in the 60s - so much for progress

    Report this comment

    Sue Steward

    Monday, January 6, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Norfolk Weather

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 12°C

min temp: 11°C

Five-day forecast

loading...

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT