The big freeze was loosening its grip on north Norfolk this morning as many roads became easier to use and a host of schools opened their doors.

To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in.

At the time of writing, just seven of the area’s schools were closed - compared with 25 at the same time yesterday.

Those that are closed are:

● Blakeney Primary

● Broadland High

● Corpusty Primary

● Kelling Primary

● Reepham High

● Reepham Primary

● Sheringham High Academy.

Temperatures remain well below freezing in most areas, with reports of -8C at Holt.

Many people woke to find that there had been a little more overnight snow. At Cromer, there was a sprinkling of icing sugar-like snow that was melting away quickly.

There were also reports that roads in and around North Walsham and Aylsham are particularly treacherous.

Norfolk Police warned all drivers to take great care, and advised people to leave more space between themselves and the driver in front.

-All waste, recycling and garden waste collections have resumed this morning across north Norfolk.

Collections are currently one day behind in most areas and crews will first concentrate on collections that were due to be completed on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Although collections are behind, residents are asked to continue to put their bins out for collection by 7am on their normal pick-up day.

14 comments

  • Kempster: I agree with you on the first point, it was the same when I was at school. Unfortunately we now live in a far more litigious society where every slip, fall, knock or accident can be seemingly blamed on someone else, even if it is down to sheer bad luck andor judgement. Regarding your second point, schools are closed primarily due to the risks weighed in in assessing whether it is safe and practical to get several hundred children safely in in the morning and out in the late afternoon, both at times when temperatures are barely rising or starting to fall. Plus playgrounds can sheet ice which is asking for trouble... Businesses are run by adults who are far more capable (you'd like to think) of travelling safely to work. Plus they are there to generate money - which is a great motivator! I'm at work right now but I wouldn't be impressed by anyone who took a lead from teachers and gave themselves the day off!

    Report this comment

    Phil Young

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • Phil Young - When we were young, if it was too 'dangerous' to go outside we had our breaks in the gym (the only day we had off was when the boiler broke). It's not rocket science, unless you're a teacher perhaps! And why doesn't my boss give me the day off out of concern for my safety? Because we live in the real world without guaranteed pay.

    Report this comment

    Kempster

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • One has got to smile. Schools are being closed because of, "Elf and Safety," but the kids are launching themselves with total inhibition down the nearest snow covered hill on a piece of plastic with no thought as to the consequences. Seems not only do schools nowadays have Baker Days but Annual Snow Days. Time for teachers pay to be cut me thinks.

    Report this comment

    BG

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • Keeping schools closed now is a cop out by risk averse tax payer funded jobs worths. Good job those involved in the power industry don't adopt this approach or we would not have any lights on today. Most other workers get in ok so why not schools? When I went to school we had a care taker who gritted paths, etc. - where are they now? One other point, there is an incentive for schools not to open. If some children don't get in, this goes against trunacy figures which relfects badly on the school. Suspend this during bad weather and make closures as a detrimental effect on pay and I suspect that more schools would be open!

    Report this comment

    andy

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • BG - The words of someone who: a) doesn't have the responsibility for the safety of several hundred children and staff to consider; b) appears to know nothing about teaching. Apart from those important points, it's a well considered and balanced comment. What the children do outside school is the parent's concern, not the schools. And no, I'm not a teacher but school closures are just as much an inconvenience to them as to anyone else who is affected by it.

    Report this comment

    Phil Young

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • Phil, the risk of being sued is exacerbated by councils which pay out far too easily for trivial matters, including to their own staff. When I was at school and the play ground froze over, we played ice hockey! Great fun!

    Report this comment

    andy

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • Muggas Budal If you speak to those who used to attend the village school quite often they had to walk a few good miles to get there. We just seem to be going backwards in this country. If schools are having difficulty opening because their staff live so far away, why not make it a condition of their contract that they have to live within so many miles of their place of employment. Last time we had this debacle I recall the County saying they would carry out an investigation as to why so many schools closed. It seems no lessons were learnt from that exercise as it is just as bad this time round. How our friends in northern Europe must laugh at us. A few inches of snow and the county comes to a grinding halt - again!

    Report this comment

    BG

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • Closing the school is the headteachers decision alone, not that of the individual teachers. Why should they have their pay affected by a decision that they haven't made? What if the majority of them are able to travel in but the head still insists on closing the school? Do you only pay the ones who are lucky enough to live in an area unaffected by bad weather who showed willing? Ultimately if the children are told not to come in then there is no point the teachers being there. As I've stated before, it seems that it doesn't take a lot for a school to close nowadays. My point is that blaming the teachers is misguided as it is not through their choice that they have the day off. Blame the poor road maintenance and County Council.

    Report this comment

    Phil Young

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • It is not just getting in to school, with conditions improving as the day goes on, the problems occur when evening draws nigh and the weather starts to deteriorate, Tuesday was a prime example of the chaos that can occur. Teachers have duty of care to our little treasures. This extends to getting them home safely. Nowadays it is not a matter of trotting down the road to the village school, a fair amount travelling is involved. Better to call off early, at least the pupils will be at home, and running the risk of being snowed in, or, even worse, marooned in a school 'bus for hours.

    Report this comment

    Muggas Budal

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • Muggas Budal If you speak to those who used to attend the village school quite often they had to walk a few good miles to get there. We just seem to be going backwards in this country. If schools are having difficulty opening because their staff live so far away, why not make it a condition of their contract that they have to live within so many miles of their place of employment. Last time we had this debacle I recall the County saying they would carry out an investigation as to why so many schools closed. It seems no lessons were learnt from that exercise as it is just as bad this time round. How our friends in northern Europe must laugh at us. A few inches of snow and the county comes to a grinding halt - again!

    Report this comment

    BG

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • From a cursory glance of the school closures list on the Norfolk County Council website, I note that a number of schools in one particular postcode were closed, while some took the decision to open. The issues regarding safe access to the schools would have been a common problem in the same locality, and staff, pupils and parents alike would have been in a similar position. Also, if the schools were closed on the grounds of staff and pupil safety, would someone care to explain why pupils sitting exams were expected to attend if said staff were unable to travel into school. :confused:

    Report this comment

    Musto_Fan

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • @ Phil Young - I recall going to school during the bad winter of 1963 and our school wasn`t shut on one single day. Unfortunately! We used to make horrendously long slides in the playground and it wasn`t until they got too big did the caretaker come out with his bucket of salt Mind you all we did was to start beavering away creating another one. I do understand where you are coming from but why is it only schools that shut at the merest hint of a bit of snow nowadays. Other people make the effort to get into work by starting out earlier etc. It just seems to me that schools capitulate far too easy nowadays. I know teachers are a bit fed up at the moment with changes to their pensions etc but at the end of the day they are employed to do a job and I think many could try a bit harder and not use the excuse of a bit of cold weather not to go into work.

    Report this comment

    BG

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • Just remember no matter whatever the weather .. Postmen and women .. Still manage to get from home to their sorting office .. And then deliver the mail for 4 hours in the snow ... Yes still deliver in the snow... Fancy walking round with your postman...?... So those that keep moaning .. Stop feeling so hard done by... Use your commonsense... And deal with it like millions did many years ago in far worse conditions ..we used to rush to school and build a big slide in the playground. Now schools shut for health and safety and kids play in the street instead.....Crazy world...?

    Report this comment

    Lionel

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • BG. I don't recall 1963 being too bad as regards the amount of snow, there sub-zero temperatures for a while, my first recollection of a hard winter was 1940, when we had snow after Christmas for over six weeks! [I still blame Irving B****y Berlin] I think this must have been when some Norfolk sage produced the weather report "fust she snew, then she blew, then she thew, then she tarned to an' frizz, " well she done that off and on until well into March. Walking to school wasn't much fun with a gap between the bottom of your shorts and the top of your Wellies. The backs of your legs got chapped, at the age of eight, a foot of snow is daunting. 1947 was similar, vast amounts of snow for weeks on end, train lines blocked. This caused many of us to miss school. Times have changed, road surfaces are more suited to ice formation [and not so well maintained] more traffic, leading to chaos on the road. Schools have bigger catchment areas which means that transport has to be organised, so ad hoc closure of schools cannot be left until lunch time.

    Report this comment

    Muggas Budal

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Norfolk Weather

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 11°C

min temp: 8°C

Five-day forecast

loading...

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT