Update: Electric supercar built in Norfolk reaches 151mph in UK land-speed record attempt

The Nemesis electric supercar, which was built by an expert team at a secret Norfolk location, during its attempt to break the UK land-speed record at Elvington Airfield, near York. Photos: Ecotricity press office. The Nemesis electric supercar, which was built by an expert team at a secret Norfolk location, during its attempt to break the UK land-speed record at Elvington Airfield, near York. Photos: Ecotricity press office.

Thursday, September 27, 2012
3:03 PM

The team behind a £750,000 supercar powered by energy from wind turbines, which was built at a secret location in Norfolk, believe they have smashed the UK land-speed record for an electric car.

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Driver Nick Ponting and Norfolk-born founder of Ecotricity Dale Vince, with the Nemesis electric supercar which attempted to break the UK land-speed record at Elvington Airfield, near York. Photos: Ecotricity press office.Driver Nick Ponting and Norfolk-born founder of Ecotricity Dale Vince, with the Nemesis electric supercar which attempted to break the UK land-speed record at Elvington Airfield, near York. Photos: Ecotricity press office.

The Nemesis, driven by Nick Ponting, 21, hit 148.7mph during a run at Elvington airfield, near York, today.

This breaks the record of 137mph set by Don Wales, the grandson of speed ace Sir Malcolm Campbell, 10 years ago.

Ponting then further extended the record later in the day, to 151mph.

But today’s achievement still needs to be ratified by the Motor Sports Association before the record can be officially declared.

The Nemesis electric supercar, which was built by an expert team at a secret Norfolk location, during its attempt to break the UK land-speed record at Elvington Airfield, near York. Photos: Ecotricity press office.The Nemesis electric supercar, which was built by an expert team at a secret Norfolk location, during its attempt to break the UK land-speed record at Elvington Airfield, near York. Photos: Ecotricity press office.

The makers of the Nemesis say it is the first electric supercar to be built in the UK and they hope it will “smash the stereotype” of electric-powered cars as boring and slow.

It was designed and built in less than two years by a team of leading British motorsport engineers in Norfolk.

It is the brainchild of Dale Vince, founder of green electricity company Ecotricity, who was born in Burgh Castle near Great Yarmouth, and founded the business in the mid 90s.

Mr Vince has said: “We built the Nemesis to smash the stereotype of electric cars as something Noddy would drive - slow, boring, not cool.”

Mr Vince said the Nemesis is powered entirely by electricity generated by Ecotricity’s network of 53 wind turbines around the UK.

The car began life as a second-hand Lotus Exige - itself designed and built in Hethel near Norwich, and which was chosen because of its light weight and superb handling characteristics - and was bought on eBay before being rebuilt from the ground up.

Mr Vince said he wanted to stimulate a debate about how everyone will move around when the world runs out of oil.

He said the Nemesis is capable of 0-100mph in 8.5 seconds and, on paper, is capable of topping 200mph.

The Nemesis can travel from 100-150 miles between charges, depending on driving style, and can be charged from empty in less than 30 minutes.

7 comments

  • Wouldn't exactly call it a super car. Be a long way down my shopping list if I was looking to spend that much money on a car.

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    Mr T

    Friday, September 28, 2012

  • The first electric supercar to be built in the UK ? What about the Tesla Roadster ?

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    GoodRockinDaddy

    Thursday, September 27, 2012

  • Isn't that John Bishop?

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    jacobite

    Friday, September 28, 2012

  • So Mr Vince thinks that the car is powered entirely by power generated from his companies own turbines? How exactly does it do that? What happens on a calm day - do they have to wait for the wind to pick up again?

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    andy

    Thursday, September 27, 2012

  • A considerable achievement spoiled by 2 things. 1 It wasn't wind electricity powered it was charged from the national grid, there is no way that Ecotricity can claim that. Had they built a temporary wind turbine at Elvington and the car was powered by only that then, even I, would have been impressed. 2 £750k for a car that's only slightly faster than my diesel Astra!! Clearly the absurd subsidies that Ecotricity have been draining from all of our utility bills have been mounting up, they had to spend it on something. Altogether a cynical attempt to try and make wind power sexy. Ask them then, how do they consider the circa 1 Tonne of neodimium in each turbine to be green, and if that's not bad enough have a look at the contents of these batteries

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    windup

    Friday, September 28, 2012

  • Agree with Andy, a car that you can only use on windy days is not a very good offering. More wind power waffle from people who gain millions from us subsidising it for them

    Report this comment

    DaveG

    Thursday, September 27, 2012

  • Good Solid Business Ltd

    Thursday, September 27, 2012

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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