Rail commuters in the east of England could be spending more than 15pc of their salary on season tickets next year, transport campaigners warn.

To send a link to this page to a friend, you must be logged in.

Annual rail fare rises are based on July’s retail price inflation (RPI) figures, which are expected to come in at just under three per cent when they are published today by the Office for National Statistics.

The Campaign for Better Transport has predicted the increase would see the annual season ticket fare for Norwich to London Liverpool Street will increase from £6,900 this year to £7,314 by the end of next year – a rise of £414.

For those travelling between Norwich and Diss, a price hike of £96 is predicted, while the season ticket fare between Norwich and Cambridge could go up by £234 from £3,900 to £4,134.

The predicted fare for Norwich to Cambridge is calculated to be 15.61pc of a person’s average salary.

The government wants to raise fares by three points above inflation for the next three years in an attempt to switch the onus for funding the railways from the taxpayer to passengers.

The total cost of running the railways is about £11bn a year, of which £7.2bn, or 65pc, comes from fares. The aim is to increase this to 75pc, while getting the industry to cut its costs.

Stephen Joseph, chief executive of the Campaign for Better Transport, said: “If the government sticks by its policy, rail fares will rise three times faster than salaries. With the economy flat-lining, this is untenable.

“The government knows they can’t continue to hit commuters – that’s why they’ve postponed the road fuel duty escalator. Now they need to do the same for rail users.

“If rail fares are allowed to gallop ahead like this, many commuters will soon being paying 10 per cent or more of their salary just to travel to work. This is no way to stimulate the economy.”

Nationally, a series of demonstrations are being held at more than 40 railway stations across the country today. including Waterloo, Euston and Kings Cross, Birmingham New Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, and Crewe.

•What do you think of the planned price rises? Leave your comments below.

13 comments

  • "enjoy meeting people on a bus"---ive heard it all now.

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • The article does state that part of the rise is to ensure that the taxpayers subsidy (this includes those taxpayers that never use a train) is reduced and that the fare payer (those that actually use the train) pay more to compensate. This, to me, appears to be perfectly reasonable as I imagine that almost all of those against the fare rises are those that use the train to get to London to earn more money than they would otherwise earn by working locally. Hence, as I am a low paid locally employed worker who doesn't require the use of a train - I am over the moon that those who travel to London to get a higher salary are actually paying more in fares and I am paying less in taxes to support their jolly lifestyle.

    Report this comment

    expat

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • These rises are acceptable, providing that assurances can be granted that they do not contiune to rise for the next 5-7 years. I understand that fares need to increase in order for the upkeep and maintance of the trains, but I just don't see where it is being spent. 2 months ago I boarded from Norwich to London and had to spend apporximately two thirds of my journey on a bus. Whilst I enjoy riding the bus and meeting new people, I had originally paid for a train ticket and not a bus fare. It's annoying, because I like trains but I feel as though I am unable use them as much as I would like, due poor service and high ticket prices. I haven't been on every train, therefore I cannot say for sure, but I imagine that we have one of the worst services in the UK if not Europe. Regards, Whiley.

    Report this comment

    Whiley Boy

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • Chebram71. The DWP, like a lot of other "publically paid servants" do not live in the real world.

    Report this comment

    "V"

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • According to some staff at DWP it is reasonable for them to expect someone claiming benefits, to apply for a part time job and travel to Diss or Thetford each day by Train. Oh yeah on minimum wage get real.

    Report this comment

    chebram71

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • Thats alright though. If you are an MP or "minister" then you just claim it back on expenses, something that HMRC would never let the public do. One law for them and one law for the rest.

    Report this comment

    "V"

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • I pay nearly 8,000 a year for my season ticket plus tube travel between Norwich and London. Greater Anglia's filthy creaking, squealing ancient trains are, I'm pretty sure, the worst in the country. Probably the whole of Europe. The noise they make ensures I arrive to work most days with a splitting headache. On occasion, it has taken me between 3 and 4.5 hours to get home from work due to delays. On a regular basis the air conditioning breaks down. The conductors and cafe staff repeat their stupid scripts over and over again for absolutely no reason. We really don't care about your damn hot bacon rolls and danish pastries - I've just spent 8k, you think I'm gonna give you another fiver for a pitiful excuse for coffee?? There's brown crust on the tables. Fat people can't even get over the unmovable arm rests. Oh yes, it's that bad. After taxes and student loan I earn 18k.. after trains, that's 10k. I'd earn more working in the Norwich Wetherspoons. I do this stupid commute because I have to live in Norwich for my relationship and I have to work in London because there's only a tiny percentage of jobs in the sector I work in available in the East of England. There's only so long I can keep on doing it before Greater Anglia give me a nervous break down. I've written to them endlessly, I've written to Norfolk MPs.. I've got no idea what else we can do.

    Report this comment

    grandmadeath

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • I just wish I could afford to use the railways...... full stop....

    Report this comment

    musicman

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • Thats alright though. If you are an MP or "minister" then you just claim it back on expenses, something that HMRC would never let the public do. One law for them and one law for the rest.

    Report this comment

    "V"

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • The most expensive train fares in Europe provide returns for shareholders and investors, with a part being used to maintain, not modernise the network in the East. Abelio offered the highest returns for the treasury, that means us, and we have to see whether this translates into change. Looking at the picture above says it all, old rolling stock and not many new ideas, with buses being used to test the hardened resolve or train travellers.

    Report this comment

    ingo wagenknecht

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • They say that these excessive fare increases are required to help pay for modernisation. When you hear Network Rail saying it will cost £25 MILLION to install about 100 metres of new track at Ely North Junction, you have to ask where they get these figure!

    Report this comment

    Norfolk and Good

    Wednesday, August 15, 2012

  • Considering that rail users in one form or another are taxpayers. The extra cost of fares on top of the subsidies paid via taxes is scandalous. Why private rail companies receive around 4 billion a year from the taxpayer is unbelievable and disgusting.

    Report this comment

    norman hall

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

  • no the rises are unacceptable.some posters agree with every bit of bad news.

    Report this comment

    bookworm

    Tuesday, August 14, 2012

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Norfolk Weather

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 12°C

min temp: 11°C

Five-day forecast

loading...

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT