Surfers lead beach clean-up campaign in Lowestoft

Ollie Brown from Surfers Against Sewage collecting rubbish from Lowestoft beach.

Picture: James Bass Ollie Brown from Surfers Against Sewage collecting rubbish from Lowestoft beach. Picture: James Bass

Monday, November 12, 2012
3:30 PM

More than a dozen volunteers scoured Lowestoft’s beach for litter at the weekend as part of nationwide campaign to clean up the coastline.

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Ollie Brown from Surfers Against Sewage collecting rubbish from Lowestoft beach.

Picture: James BassOllie Brown from Surfers Against Sewage collecting rubbish from Lowestoft beach. Picture: James Bass

Surfers Against Sewage (SAS) urged people to join them on Sunday as they traipsed the length and breadth of the beach collecting baskets full of rubbish in an attempt to improve the area for people and wildlife.

Lowestoft is one of 19 beaches targeted as part of their war on waste, which has already seen them collect more than a tonne of marine litter this autumn.

Dominic Ferris, campaign officer for SAS, led the clean up between 11am and 1pm. He said: “Like a lot of beaches we visit, Lowestoft is well looked after by the council and the local community.

“What that allows us to do is to come in and pick up the bits people have missed. Most beaches across the country have a problems with mirco plastic – the tiny pieces of plastic that can have real damaging affect on the environment. Plastic doesn’t biodegrade and only gets smaller. Some people say that there isn’t a marine species in the world that doesn’t have plastic in its system, and that is worrying since plastic was only introduced in the late fifties. But we are not going to stop the problem by just doing beach cleans. We need to use the general swell of support and urge the government to stop it getting into the environment in the first place by looking at ways of using less packaging.”

According to the SAS, more than 100,000 marine mammals and turtles, and more than one million sea birds, die every year from ingesting plastic, or becoming entangled in it.

Mr Ferris added: “Lowestoft has a really healthy surfing community and it is nice to see them come down and give their time to helping clean up the beaches.”

The SAS is a charity protecting the UK’s oceans and beaches through campaigning and conservation work.

For more information visit www.sas.org.uk

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