Second lorry gets stuck in Norwich Lanes in as many weeks

Lorry gets stuck on Lobster Lane, Norwich; Photo credit: Staff. Lorry gets stuck on Lobster Lane, Norwich; Photo credit: Staff.

Friday, March 21, 2014
5:26 PM

Shop workers and passers by were shocked for the second time in as many weeks today when another large lorry got stuck in an area of Norwich Lanes.

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Lorry gets stuck on Lobster Lane, Norwich; Photo credit: Staff.Lorry gets stuck on Lobster Lane, Norwich; Photo credit: Staff.

The Poundworld lorry got stuck this morning on Lobster Lane, in the city centre, and was escorted by police as it reversed back onto Pottergate.

The lorry was freed by about 11.30am.

A similar incident happened last Wednesday morning when an MF Tyler lorry got stuck as the driver was travelling along Bedford Street and attempted to cross London Street and turn into Opie Street.

Video and photo gallery: Lorry gets stuck between bollards in Norwich Lanes

It was understood that he was following a Sat Nav.

22 comments

  • Well its not going to happen, large lorries will always come into the City, as it is cost effect, using smaller lorries cost to much, so all the moaning and groaning and stamping of the feet isn't going to change anything. The Councils certainly would not change the restrictions in regards to weights and widths. because if shops can't get their goods into their premises then they will just shut up shop and close and you will have boarded up shops in the City centre and this will certainly not pull in the shoppers. bringing goods in by train certainly would not work as you would need alot of goods trains per day to supply all the shops in the City centre along with all the market stalls etc, and to have a holding area on the outskirts of the City it would have to be huge.. not happening ..

    Report this comment

    Lyn Flatt

    Saturday, March 22, 2014

  • The only comment on here that has the right take on this was posted by Footyboy. The railway abandoned parcels and freight something like 30 - 40 years ago. People do not have a clue of what is involved in getting goods to the shops and this is the only way by road. To deliver to a strange town is a nightmare, having done it pre satnav days because you never find anyone who knows where it is or the best way to get to that point but now if you are following a satnav it is far from easy to get a large lorry back out from a wrong place, people would get a surprise if they could try for themselves how hard it is.

    Report this comment

    blackdog2

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • Great idea. Just need some specialist freight train wagons that run all through the night and a about £50 million worth of additional infrastructure to get the cargo to and from them and we'll have an HGV-free city. A loaf of bread will cost £89 but hey. Common sense.

    Report this comment

    Capac Raimi

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • Firstly alot of towns and Cities streets were made and built hundreds of years ago long before anyone had heard of a lorry, but towns and Cities shops have got bigger but the streets obviously haven't and can not cope with the size of the vehicles using them, so who's to blame? is it the town or City or is it the fault of the shops. well I will leave that for you to decide, this latest lorry comes from Normanton West Yorkshire and the driver may have never been to Norwich before, alike many Norwich people may have never been to Normanton in West Yorkshire so if you were put in a 40 foot lorry and told to go to Normanton you would have problems as well I would imagine, now this can be solved quite easily instead of a 40 foot lorry which can carry alot more, you can do these deliveries on a 7.5 ton lorry, but where it takes one 40 foot lorry to do a delivery it will take mulitple 7.5ton lorries to do the same one delivery and if thats the case it will cost more in extra driver's wages more money in diesel costs and haulage charges. and these extra costs will be placed on the price of the goods which the shopper WILL have to pay for, this lorry obviously took a wrong turn, and obviously once the driver realised this, he was stuck and couldn't do anything unlike a car who can move and turn round alot more easier and get out of a muddle alot more easily.

    Report this comment

    Footyboy16

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • The attitude towards my suggestion explains why this city will never change very much, large city with a small town attitude. the local council also suffer from this so we will never make the best of any opportunity, think smal and you will get mediocrity. If this city had more about it maybe we wouldn't get forgotten when it come to major links and other Infrastructure investment, but as it stands we seem happy to be little norwich. No proper rail link to Norwich and the north, a proper intergrated transport system even a ferry link to the continent. Large City, small town attitude and always will be.

    Report this comment

    parkeg1

    Sunday, March 23, 2014

  • Rail freight into any town or City is never going to happen, just look at how many Tesco,Morrison's Asda, Sainsbury's there are in the City it would be a full time job just for 7.5 ton trucks to keep them supllied. along with all the other bigger chain of shops. so you haven't got a hope in hell. you have more of a chance of getting all deliveries done at night. these larger lorries would have it alot easier if cars did not park willy nilly in the streets, you only need one car parked incorrectly to cause a problem for a lorry.

    Report this comment

    Footyboy16

    Saturday, March 22, 2014

  • Ref "Parkeg1" so all the deliveries will come into Norwich by freight train to Norwich station and will be off loaded onto 7.5 ton lorries and then delivered to local shops...well you are going to need one hell of alot of 7.5 ton lorries to cover all the shops in the City, and where are all these lorries going to sit at the rail station? and all these 7.5 ton (smaller lorries) will need drivers and fuel and these costs will still have to be met by the consumer, if you are not going to use articulated lorries.. and what happens when there are delays on the rail line? so at the end of the day it is articulated lorry or NOTHING.. but in an ideal world all deliveries would be done during the night when there are no traffic on the city streets so they do not get in the way of delivery lorries.

    Report this comment

    Footyboy16

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • Did the driver use a £1 SatNav from erm Poundworld, by any chance?

    Report this comment

    che bramley

    Saturday, March 22, 2014

  • For you pro railway people, how do you get a lorry load of freight from the railway station to the shops?

    Report this comment

    KeithS

    Saturday, March 22, 2014

  • @footyboy16, I only know of one large supermarket in Norwich and that's Morrisons near the football ground, all the rest are either small stores or are on the outskirts so they are not a problem. The small stores can be served bythe larger store. Having deliveries carried out at night doesn't make the roads wider. @KeithS using smaller vans and trucks to do local deliveries from the freight yard.

    Report this comment

    parkeg1

    Saturday, March 22, 2014

  • All that is necessary is a weight restriction- or at least for the council to request all shops to inform their suppliers that access is limited to lorries under a certain size. If the bollards are necessary to protect old buildings and the lorries have got too big to fit then they suppliers will have to comply with local conditions. The streets have no changed it is companies being greedy-who cares if there is no Poundworld?

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Saturday, March 22, 2014

  • The only comment on here that has the right take on this was posted by Footyboy. The railway abandoned parcels and freight something like 30 - 40 years ago. People do not have a clue of what is involved in getting goods to the shops and this is the only way by road. To deliver to a strange town is a nightmare, having done it pre satnav days because you never find anyone who knows where it is or the best way to get to that point but now if you are following a satnav it is far from easy to get a large lorry back out from a wrong place, people would get a surprise if they could try for themselves how hard it is.

    Report this comment

    blackdog2

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • PoundLAND? Look again!

    Report this comment

    Only Me

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • Footyboy the answer is to be as it was when the shops were built-have local suppliers. The turnover of goods in city centre shops may not be much higher, the size of the product may not be any bigger all that is different is centralisation of suppliers-most often because what is being sold comes from China If Poundworld is selling much made in Normanton I will eat my hat-everything has probably already come in at Felixstowe and gone up the A14 etc to a company distribution depot.

    Report this comment

    Daisy Roots

    Saturday, March 22, 2014

  • A freight rail yard would be on the outskirts of the City not at Norwich Station, so the problems of 7.5ton trucks littered all over the place is not going to happen. The 2 lines into Norwich from London and from the midlands, these enter Norwich quite close together so it would not be a big problem to site the freight yard between them we have the space to do that. The issue with truck drivers not knowing the best routes would no longer be a problem as the drivers would be local so would have good local road knowledge, all this would also create local jobs not just 7.5 ton truck drivers but also at the freight yard. Yes it would have a setup cost, it would be a great investment and the benefits are endless. It is true, we did used to have a freight yard in Norwich many years ago and I seem to remember a parcel service to, but that doesn’t mean it’s out of date. Freight rail is used in many countries in Europe and it works very well, it’s cost effective and would raise money to keep the railways in better condition. There are other option to large trucks but people need to be open to something different and not have the "we've alway done it like this" attitude.

    Report this comment

    parkeg1

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • Get it right Archant, it was not Poundland, it was Poundworld, and what will it take stop these juggernauts from ruining our streets, I know stuff has to be delivered, but weight restrictions must be introduced

    Report this comment

    Derek McDonald

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • It is worth pointing out that the council is likely at fault here, since there isn't a maximum weight, length, width or HGV unsuitability warning posted along the goods delivery access from Pottergate. However, there are numerous bollards that should have alerted the truck driver to the difficulty ahead.

    Report this comment

    Pink Duck

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • Why not close all the shops in the City, problem solved.

    Report this comment

    nicholas dasey

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • Close, got the first part right!

    Report this comment

    suchfun

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • Firstly alot of towns and Cities streets were made and built hundreds of years ago long before anyone had heard of a lorry, but towns and Cities shops have got bigger but the streets obviously haven't and can not cope with the size of the vehicles using them, so who's to blame? is it the town or City or is it the fault of the shops. well I will leave that for you to decide, this latest lorry comes from Normanton West Yorkshire and the driver may have never been to Norwich before, alike many Norwich people may have never been to Normanton in West Yorkshire so if you were put in a 40 foot lorry and told to go to Normanton you would have problems as well I would imagine, now this can be solved quite easily instead of a 40 foot lorry which can carry alot more, you can do these deliveries on a 7.5 ton lorry, but where it takes one 40 foot lorry to do a delivery it will take mulitple 7.5ton lorries to do the same one delivery and if thats the case it will cost more in extra driver's wages more money in diesel costs and haulage charges. and these extra costs will be placed on the price of the goods which the shopper WILL have to pay for, this lorry obviously took a wrong turn, and obviously once the driver realised this, he was stuck and couldn't do anything unlike a car who can move and turn round alot more easier and get out of a muddle alot more easily.

    Report this comment

    Footyboy16

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • The only comment on here that has the right take on this was posted by Footyboy. The railway abandoned parcels and freight something like 30 - 40 years ago. People do not have a clue of what is involved in getting goods to the shops and this is the only way by road. To deliver to a strange town is a nightmare, having done it pre satnav days because you never find anyone who knows where it is or the best way to get to that point but now if you are following a satnav it is far from easy to get a large lorry back out from a wrong place, people would get a surprise if they could try for themselves how hard it is.

    Report this comment

    blackdog2

    Friday, March 21, 2014

  • I have a much better idea, why not put the bulk frieght onto the rail line and use smaller vehicles to do the local deliveries, the money raised by using the railway could pay to upgrade the railway and we don't get so many large trucks ruinining our local road and getting stuck in small roads. I think that's called a win win situation, common sense is not that common anymore.

    Report this comment

    parkeg1

    Friday, March 21, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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