Review could mean more moorings in the Norfolk Broads

Moorings at How Hill Moorings at How Hill

Monday, June 30, 2014
11:00 AM

The number of moorings on the Norfolk Broads could be expanded because of increasing numbers of private boats.

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Malcolm Valentine, of the Yare Valley Sailing Club, told Saturday’s annual meeting there was a need for more safety pontoons along the whole of the Broads network. Authority chairman Stephen Johnson told him a working group to assess the provision will meet next month.

Speaking afterwards, Broads Authority chief executive John Packman, (pictured), said there are 63 free 24-hour moorings, and added: “Moorings is becoming more of an issue because the number of private boats has increased, and that is putting pressure on the moorings.” He said the authority was investigating their life-time and replacement costs, and there was a constant juggling act between users who want more moorings, and the limited pot of money. He said some new moorings had been provided with Network Rail money, and the authority was looking at other external funding options.

7 comments

  • There may be more private boats on the Broads, but if you look at the size of some of the hire craft, which are getting larger. We do need more free mooring.

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    SweetKingfisher

    Thursday, July 3, 2014

  • Dear Sir, Your correspondent Martin George and his interview with Dr John Packman completely missed the point. My concern was not about leisure moorings but about the provision of safe moorings for sailing yachts to raise and lower their masts and sails primarily on the lower Bure but also other rivers that feed into Breydon Water. The Environmental Agency in collaboration with the local planning body, the Broads Authority has removed many of the informal fixed pilled moorings on the Lower Bure. As a result there are now no public moorings between Stracy Mill and Great Yarmouth Yacht Station. Consequently there is no longer a safe place for sailing yachts to lower their sails and masts before going through the bridges at Great Yarmouth. Similarly for the reverse procedure, there is no safe place within the inappropriately named Yacht Station or upstream until the Stracy Mill. My argument is simple. Either replace the removed key headings (which won’t happen because of injured pride syndrom) or provide safe floating pontoons near great Yarmouth. These pontoons will allow every sailor moored to them the option of lowering or raising their mast and sails in safety rather battling a 4-8 knot tidal current. These pontoons will be ideal for the less nimble sailors, those who sail single handed or those who do not have the confidence to undertake these tricky operations on the move. I also said at the meeting that safety pontoons were required on the lower Yare at Berney Arms and the lower Wensum at Burgh Castle. The reasons are that getting on and off boats adjacent to high walled moorings was difficult and dangerous because of fast currents. In addition some pontoons are required on Breydon Water for the same reasons but these should be aligned along the length of Breydon Water in a WSW ENE direction in line with the prevailing winds which occur for over 50% of the time during the sailing season. The Yare Valley Sailing Club which you mention, is not a racing club but a cruising club that sails over the whole of the Broads navigation area every year. We are in an ideal position to know the practical problems and keen to assist the BA in their navigation decisions in a positive manner. Of the 45 or so non BA people who attended the meeting you mention 14 were from the YVSC.

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    Malcolm Valentine

    Wednesday, July 2, 2014

  • more moorings would be very welcome , great news

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    Susan Collard

    Tuesday, July 1, 2014

  • Two points here, it wasn't entirely the Broads Authority that messed up good moorings, more that it was down to the Environment Agency. Secondly 'civilised' moorings, we are talking moorings in the natural environment, do we need everything urbanised? Granted that more moorings would be appreciated but need they be over the top as some undoubtedly are? I'm not a great fan of the Authority but they shouldn't have to shoulder the entire blame. We now live in a 'compo' age thus moorings will be lost as landowners attempt to avoid potential 'compo' claims.

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    peter waller

    Tuesday, July 1, 2014

  • It's not a question of mains power points; it's a matter of civilised moorings suitable for all ages, rather than a dangerous scramble up a slippery bank.

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    The man on the Clapham Omnibus

    Tuesday, July 1, 2014

  • Perhaps, more to the point, people should be weaned off mains power points and encouraged to use 'natural' moorings as was always the way in days gone by.

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    peter waller

    Tuesday, July 1, 2014

  • I agree that moor mooring are required. Some of the reasons is because the Broads Authority have closed 100's of feet along some banks like Fleet dyke, River Bure from Saint Bennets towards Thurne mouth just to mention a couple. Fleet dyke was very popular with fishermen and boaters alike, but that has now gone. "Wild moorings" have always been popular with boaters for the quiet and easy to moor places. Ideal for wild life watching, fishing, dog walking etc. So come B A get your act together and replace what was there before YOU messed up.

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    paul sergent

    Monday, June 30, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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